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Couple of interesting Scottish writers talking about their books: Anne Donovan and Christopher Brookmyre.

Reopening Govanhill Library

Anne Donovan at Govanhill Library

Tuesday 19 October, 2pm Free

To help celebrate the re-opening of Govanhill Library, Coatbridge born author Anne Donovan discusses her novels Buddha Da and Being Emily at this free talk. Spaces will be given on a first come first served basis.

Christopher Brookmyre at Govanhill Library

Monday 25 October, 6.30pm FREE

The Glaswegian Crime author comes to Govanhill to talk about his books including Pandaemonium, Boiling A Frog, A Snow Ball In Hell and much more.

170 Langside Road, Glasgow G42 7JU

Telephone: 0141 276 1550

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Couple of interesting Scottish writers talking about their books: Anne Donovan and Christopher Brookmyre.

Reopening Govanhill Library

Anne Donovan at Govanhill Library

Tuesday 19 October, 2pm Free

To help celebrate the re-opening of Govanhill Library, Coatbridge born author Anne Donovan discusses her novels Buddha Da and Being Emily at this free talk. Spaces will be given on a first come first served basis.

Christopher Brookmyre at Govanhill Library

Monday 25 October, 6.30pm FREE

The Glaswegian Crime author comes to Govanhill to talk about his books including Pandaemonium, Boiling A Frog, A Snow Ball In Hell and much more.

170 Langside Road, Glasgow G42 7JU

Telephone: 0141 276 1550

I've just bought my first Christopher Brookmyre. A big boy done it and ran away. I loved Buddha Da and I love everything Louise Welsh writes. I have to confess, a complete darling tho' he is, I have never managed to finish anything by Alistair Gray.

Sounds like a good way to send some cauld winter nights. smile.gif

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I've just bought my first Christopher Brookmyre. A big boy done it and ran away. I loved Buddha Da and I love everything Louise Welsh writes. I have to confess, a complete darling tho' he is, I have never managed to finish anything by Alistair Gray.

Sounds like a good way to send some cauld winter nights. smile.gif

Christopher Brookmyre definitely has his own style and can be very amusing. I loved 'Buddha Da' too and laughed my head off as much as at any book I've ever read. Her next book 'Being Emily' was also good and I enjoy her use of the Glaswegian dialect but it wasn't so outstanding as 'Buddha Da'.

I found Louise Welsh's 'The Cutting Room' particularly enjoyable as I recognised some of the Westenders that she had based some of her characters on.

If se don't mention Denise Mina we are going to be in big trouble with tam. :lol: Her book 'Field of Blood' will be dramatised for tele next year.

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I've just bought my first Christopher Brookmyre. A big boy done it and ran away. I loved Buddha Da and I love everything Louise Welsh writes. I have to confess, a complete darling tho' he is, I have never managed to finish anything by Alistair Gray.

Sounds like a good way to send some cauld winter nights. smile.gif

Alasdair Gray is one of Glasgow's true gems, a very talented author and artist. He is also a very witty and smart man - very capable of putting some in their place. :lol:

http://www.glasgowwestend.co.uk/eating/eatingdrinking.php#alasdair

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Sounds like a good way to send some cauld winter nights. %7Boption%7D

Issat you reading my mind.

Oanyway, youse lot shuid be ashamed....yeese had a book thingmie going and there were some terrific posts...Lyn, Snow White, and Gayle come tae mind...their insights intae Buddha Da wur eye openers for me....Pat got away mair oot of that book than mahsel...then yeese quit, stopped, held fast tae motionless, did nothing.

A couple of Scottish writers that are all but forgotten....Buchan and A.J. Cronin. Denise will be remembered a long time for "Exile" and ay cannae get over how guid a read that was....mind she treats the sexy bits the way Mordecai Richler did, meanin they urnae very tittilating.

First book of "A Scots Quayre". I probably have that wrong but yees shuid know Gibbon....and Pat, you try "smeeden" one of his short stories....and forgive his lack of output because the man worked mair than one job tae feed his family. Rankin does amaze me because ye look at the number of "Rebus" books and the very last may very well have been the best. RLS, almost forgotten, let us hope that libraries around the world will remember, Jekyll and Hyde along with Kidnapped; David Balfour should last for many generations. And i nearly forgot, the master of the historical novel, Nigel Tranter or does it end or....should be admired for his dedication and research....i have it on guid authority that Nigel was a workhorse when it came to research.

Ye cuid dae one of these threads for Irish writers and American writers...WOW think of the debates, arguments, wars new insights...I like Twain but Melville, Capote...my, my, my, the lists would be endless....Brendan, ye lost it in a bottle; the Borstal boy was just tae tease. methinks am wanderin off topic.

tam

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Sounds like a good way to send some cauld winter nights. %7Boption%7D

Issat you reading my mind.

Oanyway, youse lot shuid be ashamed....yeese had a book thingmie going and there were some terrific posts...Lyn, Snow White, and Gayle come tae mind...their insights intae Buddha Da wur eye openers for me....Pat got away mair oot of that book than mahsel...then yeese quit, stopped, held fast tae motionless, did nothing.

A couple of Scottish writers that are all but forgotten....Buchan and A.J. Cronin. Denise will be remembered a long time for "Exile" and ay cannae get over how guid a read that was....mind she treats the sexy bits the way Mordecai Richler did, meanin they urnae very tittilating.

First book of "A Scots Quayre". I probably have that wrong but yees shuid know Gibbon....and Pat, you try "smeeden" one of his short stories....and forgive his lack of output because the man worked mair than one job tae feed his family. Rankin does amaze me because ye look at the number of "Rebus" books and the very last may very well have been the best. RLS, almost forgotten, let us hope that libraries around the world will remember, Jekyll and Hyde along with Kidnapped; David Balfour should last for many generations. And i nearly forgot, the master of the historical novel, Nigel Tranter or does it end or....should be admired for his dedication and research....i have it on guid authority that Nigel was a workhorse when it came to research.

Ye cuid dae one of these threads for Irish writers and American writers...WOW think of the debates, arguments, wars new insights...I like Twain but Melville, Capote...my, my, my, the lists would be endless....Brendan, ye lost it in a bottle; the Borstal boy was just tae tease. methinks am wanderin off topic.

tam

No tae mention Irvine Welsh.

Great new book by Alasdair Gray just gone on sale:

"A Life in Pictures' this multi-talented man has, of course, done the illustrations and it is amazing.

http://www.alasdairgray.co.uk/alip.htm

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my most treasured books as a wee girl were those by George MacDonald At The Back of the North Wind /The Princess and the Goblin/ The Princess and Curdie.

He is credited as a great influence to CS Lewis and Tolkein.

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curious:-

if we were destined tae spend a long, long time on a desert isle....and we were granted a selection of books to take with us....and furstly we would be obliged to name the country which produced the best writers and be allowed to take all of the works from that countries,in your opinion, top two authors and then choose five authors at large and be allowed to take all of their works.

Let us say a person chose the US...they could then choose all of the works of the US top two writers....choosing two from, Twain, Miller (Henry and Arthur), Melville, Poe,Capote, O'neill, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, Dreisler.....lets forget that and pick England:- Shakespeare and Dickens....now you could pick all of the works of Swift (Ireland) RLS (Scotland) Balzac (France) Tolstoy (Russia) Twain (US)

See if ye chose Ireland ye wid run intae the same problem as thais picking the US, far too many choices...Russia and France the same thing...Italy might gie yees trouble as well....och and never mind Scotland, youse lot frae Glasgow wid end up in a secterian war.

Thon wisnae a guid idea, wisnae well thought oot, wis jist a time passer.

tam

Iwid re-read all of Ken Bruen and Ian Rankin....and i widnae go withoot "exile".

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curious:-

if we were destined tae spend a long, long time on a desert isle....and we were granted a selection of books to take with us....and furstly we would be obliged to name the country which produced the best writers and be allowed to take all of the works from that countries,in your opinion, top two authors and then choose five authors at large and be allowed to take all of their works.

Let us say a person chose the US...they could then choose all of the works of the US top two writers....choosing two from, Twain, Miller (Henry and Arthur), Melville, Poe,Capote, O'neill, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, Dreisler.....lets forget that and pick England:- Shakespeare and Dickens....now you could pick all of the works of Swift (Ireland) RLS (Scotland) Balzac (France) Tolstoy (Russia) Twain (US)

See if ye chose Ireland ye wid run intae the same problem as thais picking the US, far too many choices...Russia and France the same thing...Italy might gie yees trouble as well....och and never mind Scotland, youse lot frae Glasgow wid end up in a secterian war.

Thon wisnae a guid idea, wisnae well thought oot, wis jist a time passer.

tam

Iwid re-read all of Ken Bruen and Ian Rankin....and i widnae go withoot "exile".

I'm all of a muddle, tam. :(

We had the Ken Bruen conversation. Yes, I like him but don't care for the Rebus books that Ian Rankin writes.

I like a lot of Irish writers. The Dubliners by Joyce is the best short story ever.

I also like Jennifer Johnston - fabulous writer.

http://www.irishwriters-online.com/jenniferjohnston.html

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I've only read one Brookmyre and wasn't too impressed. Can't remember the name now, bugger. I have another to try, I've not given up on him yet. I didn't think I'd like the Rebus books but now 4 in and really enjoying them. Haven't read any Mina yet, but have the 1st 3 sitting on the bookshelves waiting for when I have the time! Liked the 1st few Irvine Welsh novels, raved about Trainspotting to anyone who would listen, then was ill and not in Sleazy's the night they came looking for extras!! Quite a few of my mates are in that film, and I sat in Sleazys for around an hour with Ewan McGregor and Johnny Lee Miller one afternoon without realising who either of them were! " of my mates had invited them out after that days shooting was done, and I didn't know who they bloody were!! My mates only told me after we left, at my insistence, to go get food shopping (we were flatmates) and had I known I would have stayed! McGregor might have been trying to impress us, he appeared to be obsessed with death and the macabre, but I thought he was a pretentious wanker!! :lol: Haven't read newer Welsh novels yet, have heard he's gone a bit shocking for shock's sake.

read this recently and loved it:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2006/jun/24/featuresreviews.guardianreview15

Everyone should read it!! :lol: Shall we, to keep Tam happy, start the bookclub again?

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I did a reply to this and internet bloody explorer said, there has been an error.

Lyn:- dinnae re-start the book club for me, re-start it because it was interesting, informative and very well written.

tam

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Seeing as I'm now a student of said establishment, Glasgow University has emailed me a link to this:

http://glasgowtosaturn.com/currentissue/

It's all Scottish writers, whether well known or up and coming, and they've all attended Glasgow (and hopefully you guys will be able to see it!! :lol:)

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Seeing as I'm now a student of said establishment, Glasgow University has emailed me a link to this:

http://glasgowtosaturn.com/currentissue/

It's all Scottish writers, whether well known or up and coming, and they've all attended Glasgow (and hopefully you guys will be able to see it!! :lol:)

It doesn't appear to be inclusive? :lol:

Rupert the Bear is 90.

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These days my reading is directed by the most popular books on loan for two weeks from the library. That's because I never leave myself enough time for a good browse.

However, next time I am in town I'm going to purchase William McIlvanney's book 'Weekend', which I've not read and his son Liam McIlvanney's book 'All the Colours of the Town'.

Anybody read either of them?

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'Weekend' by William McIlvanney

(been glued to this for the past two days)

There's a whole lot going on in this book and it has a very different setting from the previous McIllvaney books I've read. No rough and tough working class charactes such as you come across in 'The Hard Man' or 'Docherty'. The setting for this tale is a stately house, Willowvale, on Cannamore a Scottish island, where a group of students and their lecturers have got together for a weekend workshop on creative writing and literature.

McIllvanney introduces us to a vast array of characters, mostly with something on their mind apart from their interest in literature. Given the scale of the cast you feel as if you get the mettle of most, if not all of them. In fact you may think you have come across them at some point - probably in the Chip, which gets a mention.

The book is wide ranging and complex with lots of intrigue, liaisons, romance and comedy also a fair amount of lust, guilt, pride, deceit and disappointment. It's structure is unusual and apart from dialogue and description, the novel includes extracts from lectures on topics such as 'Oedipus and the Sphinx' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'. In contrast it includes a very long and humorous letter of complaint to one of the academics from the Chairperson of a Women's Guild. However, it escapes being overly tricky because of McIllvaney's easy style in presenting his material but it is a demanding read.

His writing is superb and an absolute treat. In fact, the one problem I had with the book was that at times I lost focus on the story as my mind drifted to the author and his amazing powers of description and skill in the use of language.

Here's a couple of smart wee snippets to whet your appetitie:

"He didn't understand his tears. He simply felt the wisdom of his eyes in weeping. "

" Just when your pomposity was in danger of turning you into your own statue, life dropped birdshot on your head."

You'll find in depth reviews here:

Reeling and writhing by Carol Birch

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/weekend-by-william-mcilvanney-419759.html

Irvine Welsh - The Guardian

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2006/aug/26/featuresreviews.guardianreview21

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Robert Service: The Bard of the Yukon.

I though he was born in Glasgow but he was born in Preston, to a Scottish/Glaswegian family. He was educated at Hill-head school, in Glasgow....emigrated to Canada when he was twenty-one years old.

tam

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Robert Service: The Bard of the Yukon.

I though he was born in Glasgow but he was born in Preston, to a Scottish/Glaswegian family. He was educated at Hill-head school, in Glasgow....emigrated to Canada when he was twenty-one years old.

tam

His neice was a doctor in Dennistoun

The Quitter

When you're lost in the Wild, and you're scared as a child,

And Death looks you bang in the eye,

And you're sore as a boil, it's according to Hoyle

To cock your revolver and . . . die.

But the Code of a Man says: "Fight all you can,"

And self-dissolution is barred.

In hunger and woe, oh, it's easy to blow . . .

It's the hell-served-for-breakfast that's hard.

"You're sick of the game!" Well, now, that's a shame.

You're young and you're brave and you're bright.

"You've had a raw deal!" I know -- but don't squeal,

Buck up, do your damnedest, and fight.

It's the plugging away that will win you the day,

So don't be a piker, old pard!

Just draw on your grit; it's so easy to quit:

It's the keeping-your-chin-up that's hard.

It's easy to cry that you're beaten -- and die;

It's easy to crawfish and crawl;

But to fight and to fight when hope's out of sight --

Why, that's the best game of them all!

And though you come out of each gruelling bout,

All broken and beaten and scarred,

Just have one more try -- it's dead easy to die,

It's the keeping-on-living that's hard.

Robert William Service

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The man frae Oz deserves a medal. I do not recall having read that one before, mind i was daein a bit of drinkin when i discovered Service, actually a drinkin buddy led me tae the man and my friend could recite a couple of Service poems, in their entirety.

GUD GUID GUID and has my vote for post of the year.

tam

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Here Tam anither yin

The Gramaphone At Fond-Du-Lac

Now Eddie Malone got a swell grammyfone to draw all the trade to his store;

An' sez he: "Come along for a season of song, which the like ye had niver before."

Then Dogrib, an' Slave, an' Yellow-knife brave, an' Cree in his dinky canoe,

Confluated near, to see an' to hear Ed's grammyfone make its dayboo.

Then Ed turned the crank, an' there on the bank they squatted like bumps on a log.

For acres around there wasn't a sound, not even the howl of a dog.

When out of the horn there sudden was born such a marvellous elegant tone;

An' then like a spell on that auddyence fell the voice of its first grammyfone.

"Bad medicine!" cried Old Tom, the One-eyed, an' made for to jump in the lake;

But no one gave heed to his little stampede, so he guessed he had made a mistake.

Then Roll-in-the-Mud, a chief of the blood, observed in choice Chippewayan:

"You've brought us canned beef, an' it's now my belief that this here's a case of canned man."

Well, though I'm not strong on the Dago in song, that sure got me goin' for fair.

There was Crusoe an' Scotty, an' Ma'am Shoeman Hank, an' Melber an' Bonchy was there.

'Twas silver an' gold, an' sweetness untold to hear all them big guinneys sing;

An' thick all around an' inhalin' the sound, them Indians formed in a ring.

So solemn they sat, an' they smoked an' they spat, but their eyes sort o' glistened an' shone;

Yet niver a word of approvin' occurred till that guy Harry Lauder came on.

Then hunter of moose, an' squaw an' papoose jest laughed till their stummicks was sore;

Six times Eddie set back that record an' yet they hollered an' hollered for more.

I'll never forget that frame-up, you bet; them caverns of sunset agleam;

Them still peaks aglow, them shadders below, an' the lake like a petrified dream;

The teepees that stood by the edge of the wood; the evenin' star blinkin' alone;

The peace an' the rest, an' final an' best, the music of Ed's grammyfone.

Then sudden an' clear there rang on my ear a song mighty simple an' old;

Heart-hungry an' high it thrilled to the sky, all about "silver threads in the gold".

'Twas tender to tears, an' it brung back the years, the mem'ries that hallow an' yearn;

'Twas home-love an' joy, 'twas the thought of my boy . . . an' right there I vowed I'd return.

Big Four-finger Jack was right at my back, an' I saw with a kind o' surprise,

He gazed at the lake with a heartful of ache, an' the tears irrigated his eyes.

An' sez he: "Cuss me, pard! but that there hits me hard; I've a mother does nuthin' but wait.

She's turned eighty-three, an' she's only got me, an' I'm scared it'll soon be too late."

* * * * *

On Fond-du-lac's shore I'm hearin' once more that blessed old grammyfone play.

The summer's all gone, an' I'm still livin' on in the same old haphazardous way.

Oh, I cut out the booze, an' with muscles an' thews I corralled all the coin to go back;

But it wasn't to be: he'd a mother, you see, so I -- sliped it to Four-finger Jack.

Robert William Service

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Here Tam anither yin

The Gramaphone At Fond-Du-Lac

Now Eddie Malone got a swell grammyfone to draw all the trade to his store;

An' sez he: "Come along for a season of song, which the like ye had niver before."

Then Dogrib, an' Slave, an' Yellow-knife brave, an' Cree in his dinky canoe,

Confluated near, to see an' to hear Ed's grammyfone make its dayboo.

Then Ed turned the crank, an' there on the bank they squatted like bumps on a log.

For acres around there wasn't a sound, not even the howl of a dog.

When out of the horn there sudden was born such a marvellous elegant tone;

An' then like a spell on that auddyence fell the voice of its first grammyfone.

"Bad medicine!" cried Old Tom, the One-eyed, an' made for to jump in the lake;

But no one gave heed to his little stampede, so he guessed he had made a mistake.

Then Roll-in-the-Mud, a chief of the blood, observed in choice Chippewayan:

"You've brought us canned beef, an' it's now my belief that this here's a case of canned man."

Well, though I'm not strong on the Dago in song, that sure got me goin' for fair.

There was Crusoe an' Scotty, an' Ma'am Shoeman Hank, an' Melber an' Bonchy was there.

'Twas silver an' gold, an' sweetness untold to hear all them big guinneys sing;

An' thick all around an' inhalin' the sound, them Indians formed in a ring.

So solemn they sat, an' they smoked an' they spat, but their eyes sort o' glistened an' shone;

Yet niver a word of approvin' occurred till that guy Harry Lauder came on.

Then hunter of moose, an' squaw an' papoose jest laughed till their stummicks was sore;

Six times Eddie set back that record an' yet they hollered an' hollered for more.

I'll never forget that frame-up, you bet; them caverns of sunset agleam;

Them still peaks aglow, them shadders below, an' the lake like a petrified dream;

The teepees that stood by the edge of the wood; the evenin' star blinkin' alone;

The peace an' the rest, an' final an' best, the music of Ed's grammyfone.

Then sudden an' clear there rang on my ear a song mighty simple an' old;

Heart-hungry an' high it thrilled to the sky, all about "silver threads in the gold".

'Twas tender to tears, an' it brung back the years, the mem'ries that hallow an' yearn;

'Twas home-love an' joy, 'twas the thought of my boy . . . an' right there I vowed I'd return.

Big Four-finger Jack was right at my back, an' I saw with a kind o' surprise,

He gazed at the lake with a heartful of ache, an' the tears irrigated his eyes.

An' sez he: "Cuss me, pard! but that there hits me hard; I've a mother does nuthin' but wait.

She's turned eighty-three, an' she's only got me, an' I'm scared it'll soon be too late."

* * * * *

On Fond-du-lac's shore I'm hearin' once more that blessed old grammyfone play.

The summer's all gone, an' I'm still livin' on in the same old haphazardous way.

Oh, I cut out the booze, an' with muscles an' thews I corralled all the coin to go back;

But it wasn't to be: he'd a mother, you see, so I -- sliped it to Four-finger Jack.

Robert William Service

My, there's a man with a romantic view of the male species .... rolleyes.gif

"tears irrigated his eyes" laugh.gif

If you post any more of this I'm gonna have a hernia ... laugh.giflaugh.giflaugh.gif

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My, there's a man with a romantic view of the male species .... rolleyes.gif

"tears irrigated his eyes" laugh.gif

If you post any more of this I'm gonna have a hernia ... laugh.giflaugh.giflaugh.gif

Therr ya go Harps

Hernia t'day goan termorra

A Bachelor

'Why keep a cow when I can buy,'

Said he, 'the milk I need,'

I wanted to spit in his eye

Of selfishness and greed;

But did not, for the reason he

Was stronger than I be.

I told him: ''Tis our human fate,

For better or for worse,

That man and maid should love and mate,

And little children nurse.

Of course, if you are less than man

You can't do what we can.

'So many loving maids would wed,

And wondrous mothers be.'

'I'll buy the love I want,' he said,

'No squally brats for me.'

. . . I hope the devil stoketh well

For him a special hell.

Robert William Service

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Therr ya go Harps

Hernia t'day goan termorra

A Bachelor

'Why keep a cow when I can buy,'

Said he, 'the milk I need,'

I wanted to spit in his eye

Of selfishness and greed;

But did not, for the reason he

Was stronger than I be.

I told him: ''Tis our human fate,

For better or for worse,

That man and maid should love and mate,

And little children nurse.

Of course, if you are less than man

You can't do what we can.

'So many loving maids would wed,

And wondrous mothers be.'

'I'll buy the love I want,' he said,

'No squally brats for me.'

. . . I hope the devil stoketh well

For him a special hell.

Robert William Service

You're just trying to take my mind off THAT rugby game.. you never did come back with the score ... rolleyes.giftongue.gif

I'll keep this for the morra.... smile.gif

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You're just trying to take my mind off THAT rugby game.. you never did come back with the score ... rolleyes.giftongue.gif

I'll keep this for the morra.... smile.gif

You mean

NEW ZEALAND 49

SCOTLAND 3

or the other one where England beat Australia?? 35-18

I would like to say the poms were lucky!!!!! but I cant :lol: they played brilliantly & the Wallabies played like a bunch of girls

When Scotland plays NZ the usual question is how much will the All Blacks win by :lol:

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You mean

NEW ZEALAND 49

SCOTLAND 3

or the other one where England beat Australia?? 35-18

I would like to say the poms were lucky!!!!! but I cant sad.gif they played brilliantly & the Wallabies played like a bunch of girls

When Scotland plays NZ the usual question is how much will the All Blacks win by tongue.gif

NAW, THE OTHER WAN - AND FINE YOU KNOW!

angry.giflaugh.gif

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