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harper

Action for Happiness ...

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Anyone else picking up on this campaign? God, it's irritating. laugh.gif

If anyone came within a mile of me offering to do this I'd be tempted to thump them but it might work for some?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/8446707/Actions-for-happiness-will-buying-a-stranger-a-coffee-enhance-your-wellbeing.html

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Anyone else picking up on this campaign? God, it's irritating. laugh.gif

If anyone came within a mile of me offering to do this I'd be tempted to thump them but it might work for some?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/8446707/Actions-for-happiness-will-buying-a-stranger-a-coffee-enhance-your-wellbeing.html

Giving the bumsrush to this coalition Government would make me happy

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I'd be happy with a free cup of coffee. :lol:

What if it's a latte instead of an americano, gladtae? :lol:

A lot of stuff on that list people do without thinking - passing on books, letting someone go before you in the supermarket if they have one thing and you are laden. However, the mind boggles at the idea of paying for someone behind me in the queue to get into a concert or the flicks - I'm afraid that would make me miserable and them terrified.

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What if it's a latte instead of an americano, gladtae? :lol:

A lot of stuff on that list people do without thinking - passing on books, letting someone go before you in the supermarket if they have one thing and you are laden. However, the mind boggles at the idea of paying for someone behind me in the queue to get into a concert or the flicks - I'm afraid that would make me miserable and them terrified.

I was assuming it'd be a cappuccino :lol:

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I was assuming it'd be a capuccino :lol:

According to the approach who is it that's meant to be happy? Is it the giver or the receiver?

You might just have to put a good face on it. :lol:

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I agree, lots of things on the list are just good manners. The whole things seems a bit too happy clappy for me and I deeply resent any Government telling me what's good for me.... guaranted to bring on a major grump.

The Buddhists are big on happiness but don't divorce it from acceptance, suffering and endurence. All this quick fix, stuff hacks me off. Same with new age stuff. angry.gif

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Nice one, Samsetc. I'm a non-combatant, but the current Government of callow, public school bumboys gie's me the bowk..

This shower's PR campaign to make Brits 'happier' and 'better' is nothing more than patronising hoodwinkery. Its real aim is to make us believe our misery is our own fault.

The proposition that you can engineer a "Big Society" with a budgetary meat axe is pure Orwellian cant.

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Nice one, Samsetc. I'm a non-combatant, but the current Government of callow, public school bumboys gie's me the bowk..

This shower's PR campaign to make Brits 'happier' and 'better' is nothing more than patronising hoodwinkery. Its real aim is to make us believe our misery is our own fault.

The proposition that you can engineer a "Big Society" with a budgetary meat axe is pure Orwellian cant.

The whole idea of the 'Big Society' is becoming more and more of an embarrassment for this embarrassing Government, Sgriob.

Vision Housing, a project which finds homes for former prisoners and aims to reduce reoffending is under threat of closure due to cutbacks in crisis loans. The project was lauded by Cameron on Sky News as being 'exactly the sort of organisation" they would wish to expand and an example of the 'Big Society'.

It's the sort of project they should be encouraging with or without the Big Society because it works. "Nationally re-offending rates stand at 60%. But of those "Vision Housing" has helped just 15% have returned to crime". Mind you they needed those crisis loans.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Politics/Big-Society-Charity-Vision-Housing-Under-Threat-Over-David-Camerons-Cuts/Article/201104215972059?f=rss

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And still in the world of mental wellbeing.

Applauded for her courage, it's good to see Catherine Zeeta Jones out and about after a 5 day stay in hospital with bi-olar 2 and ready to take on two new film roles. God, if we only had treatments like that over here. rolleyes.gif

Carrie Fisher, on the other hand, has had a life long battle with bi-polar disorder and I haven't heard much about her courage? And then there's Brittany and her very public meltdown, Frank Bruno, Tony Slattery, Adam Ant, Paul Gasgoine and countless others who mental health has broken down in very public ways. I haven't heard much about their courage or the courage of the thousands of people who suffer every day from mental distress. Seems to me you are only couragous when you illness is short, managed, tidy and seemingly resolved.

I can't make up my mind whether celebrity disclosure does anything to break down the stigma around mental illness or whether it just reinforces feelings of failure for peolple suffering from severe mental illness, as the term bi-polar implies. Or maybe, it just reminds us that outcomes can be better when people receive good care and are not forced to live in bad housing and poor circumstances.

Personally, I have never actually heard of the term bi-polar 2 and you'd think after 25 years in mental health I might have come across the term. I have heard tho, that since Steven Fry went public with his diagnosis of manic depression, being worn out and a bit depressed just doesn't cut it any more.

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Bi-Polar 2 wasn't as good as the original film .............mind you who would have thought a film about a sexually confused artic bear would be so entertaining

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Bi-Polar 2 wasn't as good as the original film .............mind you who would have thought a film about a sexually confused artic bear would be so entertaining

Why didn't I think of that? We are not worthy, Samsetc. :lol: :lol: :)

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I can't make up my mind whether celebrity disclosure does anything to break down the stigma around mental illness or whether it just reinforces feelings of failure for peolple suffering from severe mental illness, as the term bi-polar implies. Or maybe, it just reminds us that outcomes can be better when people receive good care and are not forced to live in bad housing and poor circumstances.

Much wisdom in what you say, Harps. On balance (!) I'd say celeb disclosure is a good thing, given that a sense of isolation, helplessness and hopelessness are all part of the 'clinical depression' syndrome. When you're down in that terrible pit you know that nothing can help you. But when you start to crawl out, that's when the example of fellow sufferers who have made it to the light can be a real lifeline.

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Much wisdom in what you say, Harps. On balance (!) I'd say celeb disclosure is a good thing, given that a sense of isolation, helplessness and hopelessness are all part of the 'clinical depression' syndrome. When you're down in that terrible pit you know that nothing can help you. But when you start to crawl out, that's when the example of fellow sufferers who have made it to the light can be a real lifeline.

I agree with that view, Sgriob. Don't know what like the mental health services are like for ordinary folks in the USA but still pretty much the cinderella of the NHS here. In Canada there seems to be more therapy and family therapy than here where treatment is often limited to medication.

I think that celebrity disclosure helps to some extent with understanding and prejudice but there's a mountain to climb.

No, never heard of Bi-polar2, harper.

I'll see one of my friends tonight who was hospitalised with bipolar many times for long periods as a young women. Happy to say that she is doing great, has a super job and is a ray of sunshine; albeit sometimes a bit more up and disinhibited than most of us. I reckon even mental health issues occasionally have advantages. :lol:

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You are both right, of course but there is something about this particular celebrity announcment that just doesn't sit right with me. I just can't get my head round the idea of either of them being "sole carers for each other" in the way that most of us would understand it that term. That said, it's stressful and worrying for anyone to have illness in the family, so maybe I am doing them an injustice but I suspect I am reacting to the diagnosis, rather than the situation.

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You are both right, of course but there is something about this particular celebrity announcment that just doesn't sit right with me. I just can't get my head round the idea of either of them being "sole carers for each other" in the way that most of us would understand it that term. That said, it's stressful and worrying for anyone to have illness in the family, so maybe I am doing them an injustice but I suspect I am reacting to the diagnosis, rather than the situation.

I don't really know much about the announcement or their situation, harper. The description 'sole carer', although, possibly relating to being the main source of emotional support, is possibly a wee bit less arduous a task when accompanied by plenty of funds and all the staff, medical support etc that can make life easier.

Although, I suppose no matter how much practical support there is at hand you'll still be left with the fears and sadness that any serious illness can bring.

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"The current diagnoses in the UK are likely to be:

Bipolar I – characterised by manic episodes – most people will experience depressive periods as well, but not all do.

Bipolar II – characterised by severe depressive episodes alternating with episodes of hypomania.

Cyclothymic disorder – short periods of mild depression and short periods of hypomania.

Rapid cycling – four or more episodes a year. These can be manic, hypomanic, depressive or mixed episodes.

Mixed states – periods of depression and elation at the same time.

Note: An overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) can mimic the symptoms of bipolar disorder, and it is very important that this is excluded by a test of thyroid function (this is a simple blood test)."

From:

http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_and_conditions/bipolar_disorder_manic_depression

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"The current diagnoses in the UK are likely to be:

Bipolar I characterised by manic episodes most people will experience depressive periods as well, but not all do.

Bipolar II characterised by severe depressive episodes alternating with episodes of hypomania.

Cyclothymic disorder short periods of mild depression and short periods of hypomania.

Rapid cycling four or more episodes a year. These can be manic, hypomanic, depressive or mixed episodes.

Mixed states periods of depression and elation at the same time.

Note: An overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) can mimic the symptoms of bipolar disorder, and it is very important that this is excluded by a test of thyroid function (this is a simple blood test)."

From:

http://www.mind.org....anic_depression

Yes, seen that. In fact, some of my colleagues helped write bits of it. smile.gif

Sadly, in day to day practice, the psychiatric profession doesn't explore or differentiate to the same degree of detail. As I said, in 25 years, I have never come across anyone with a diagnosis of bi-polar 2 but I bet I will now.

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Sadly, in day to day practice, the psychiatric profession doesn't explore or differentiate to the same degree of detail.

That's mostly true of the psychiatric profession over here too. A psychiatrist's real function, I have come to believe, is to figure out the most appropriate medication, often by trial and error. 'Diagnosis,' per se, is more of a bureaucratic phenom necessary for justifying such prescriptions.

I'm feeling boring today.

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That's mostly true of the psychiatric profession over here too. A psychiatrist's real function, I have come to believe, is to figure out the most appropriate medication, often by trial and error. 'Diagnosis,' per se, is more of a bureaucratic phenom necessary for justifying such prescriptions.

I'm feeling boring today.

Hope that 'feeling boring' phase was fleeting, Sgriob. I'm feeling much happier because I eventually made it along to the doc after suffering from a chest infection for the past week. I'm glad to have my antibitoics, and in itself medication is no bad thing, you just feel that much more should be on offer.

There's no doubt about it that the brighter weather lifts your spirits and I spent a very happy few hours at the allotment this afternoon. I didn't achieve all that much as my energy levels are rather low but it was satisfying to pop in some garlic and poached egg plant seeds and do a bit of weeding - between frequent breaks for a wee seat.:lol:

Of course, if you are really unwell then all the sunshine in the world won't help.

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That's mostly true of the psychiatric profession over here too. A psychiatrist's real function, I have come to believe, is to figure out the most appropriate medication, often by trial and error. 'Diagnosis,' per se, is more of a bureaucratic phenom necessary for justifying such prescriptions.

I'm feeling boring today.

I'm feeling very grumpy, the state of mental health care and the air of unreality around some of the mental health promotion strategies that are being put forward at the moment.

Going back to the CZJ announcement. I like Suzanne Moore's take on the situation.

http://www.dailymail...o=feeds-newsxml

I have met her a number of times and I like her politics. Shame she writes for the Mail.

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Hope that 'feeling boring' phase was fleeting, Sgriob. I'm feeling much happier because I eventually made it along to the doc after suffering from a chest infection for the past week. I'm glad to have my antibitoics, and in itself medication is no bad thing....

Glad you're feeling better. I'm not against medication at all, certainly not for disorders of the body. I'm all for psychotropic drugs too; in many cases they are life-savers.

I used to be a fan of all recreational drugs, but not so much nowadays. Now I think using cocaine or illegal opiates is simply immoral. The reason: because their sale supports huge criminal enterprises that also traffic in murder and torture as the cost of doing business.

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I'm feeling very grumpy, the state of mental health care and the air of unreality around some of the mental health promotion strategies that are being put forward at the moment.

I blame the Tories, which shouldn't surprise you, because I blame them for everything. And the Republicans too, of course.

But seriously, it is a scandal that in some ways our attitude to mental health has gone backwards. There was a boom in the construction of mental hospitals in the 19th Century, some of them architectural marvels set in beautiful grounds. That kind of altruism is all but extinct. Most of them have since been pulled down or converted into flats for well-off. (I speak as one who grew up within range of Murthly Hospital, where my mother, aunt and granny all worked.)

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I blame the Tories, which shouldn't surprise you, because I blame them for everything. And the Republicans too, of course.

But seriously, it is a scandal that in some ways our attitude to mental health has gone backwards. There was a boom in the construction of mental hospitals in the 19th Century, some of them architectural marvels set in beautiful grounds. That kind of altruism is all but extinct. Most of them have since been pulled down or converted into flats for well-off. (I speak as one who grew up within range of Murthly Hospital, where my mother, aunt and granny all worked.)

I don't know Murthly Hospital but I still shudder thinking about places like Carstairs and Lennox Castle. (Incidently, there is a nice history of the Scottish mental health system, featuring some of the old hospitals, in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery).

I first started working in mental health as the last of the big asylums were closing. There is well founded criticism with community care but it is still far better than the old bins, as they were referred to. People were often just locked away and forgotten and some of the treatments can only be described as barbaric.

I suppose what the rich can afford is good respite care. In the 80s and 90s we used to be able to refer people to hospital when the stresses of life felt a bit too much, usually for a very short respite admisison. Given the closure of NHS psychiatric beds, it's difficult to get a hospital admission even under the most difficult of circumstances. Ironically, I work for a charity that spearheaded the closure of the big asylums. Now we have to fight so that people can get access to in patient treatment when they need it.

PS: Just googled images for Murthly Hospital

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=murthly+hospital+scotland&rls=com.microsoft:en-US&oe=utf8&redir_esc=&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=1001&bih=560

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