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How much pocket money did you get?

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Aye but did you ever walk to school in smog so thick you could smell it and not be able to see a foot in front of you ? Sit in classrooms so cold you kept your coat , hat and gloves on (if you had them) and the free milk was frozen solid ? Where you could get strapped cos someone whispered and the "teacher" decided to just assault the lot of you, cos she could. Some may say modern times are not too great but I am glad we left all that behind us.

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Guest westender

Some may say modern times are not too great but I am glad we left all that behind us.

Aye.... welcome to the wonderful world of illiterate inarticulate innumerate fat blobs who have no idea where the bloody milk comes from; and who know way too much about the adult world and nothing at all about childhood.

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You don`t know too many young people then, Westender ? There are most likely some as you describe so harshly but come on, they are definitely not all like that. I am pleased to know many articulate, attractive, kindhearted, talented and intelligent young people whom I admire for their confidence in and enjoyment of life. I fear entering into a discussion with you would be a waste of effort so I wont. I just wanted to tell you and anyone else reading that we have more to be proud of in our youngsters than not, in my opinion. Stop being negative and encourage them, I say.

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Guest onyirtodd

A, that is at the bottom of Mill Road. On Glasgow Road just before it changes back to Dumbarton Road. Next to the Cawdor Vaults pub , now known as the Boundary ?

That sounds like it.

Run by the Mir brothers. One (Tariq) ran the mini cabs and the other ran the petrol station.

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Me neither Peony, not GIVEN it. From an early age maybe about 7 or 8 years we had to do some household chore to get any. That could just have been taking out the rubbish or tidying up the sitting room, putting scatter cushions tidy etc. My mother knitted a lot for us and one job I absolutely hated was to be the one holding the skeins of wool while she rolled it into a ball :cry: There was a technique to it and I often lost attention and got it in a fankle and got scolded. As we got older it could be peeling tatties, scraping carrots or other veg. for dinner and we were expected to look after younger ones, not just ours but neighbours kids too. Our comics etc were bought for us and Friday was treat from the ice cream van night. No worries cause everyone around us seemed in the same boat. There was the odd flash kid who always had sweeties wnd he/she was popular until they ran out :lol:

Didn't everyone have staff to do all the household chores. Well I never. This is a first for me doing ones chores, oneself, unheard of for us and everyone we knew.

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Hingmie

Aye but did you ever walk to school in smog so thick you could smell it and not be able to see a foot in front of you ? Sit in classrooms so cold you kept your coat , hat and gloves on (if you had them) and the free milk was frozen solid ? Where you could get strapped cos someone whispered and the "teacher" decided to just assault the lot of you, cos she could. Some may say modern times are not too great but I am glad we left all that behind us.

The other guest

The "smogs" had just about disappeared by the mid 1960s with the Clean Air Acts and the decline of coal for heating.

Aye well thanks for letting everybody know I was going to school in the sixties :oops: It was nursery school folks, honest. :wink:

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Guest westender

I fear entering into a discussion with you would be a waste of effort so I wont.

I suspect you're right

I just wanted to tell you and anyone else reading that we have more to be proud of in our youngsters than not, in my opinion.

IMO you are underinformed.

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If you think things were bad there try going to school when temp is in low 100s , in real money.

At a nursery school in the outback here near Willimakranka Then drought had lasted 7 years so when it did start raining the teacher had to throw a bucket of dust over the kids to calm them down

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One rickett, tuppence ha'penny, aye & glad to get it anaw.

Do YOU mean a briquette for tuppence ha`penny ? How could you buy a rickett ?

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I know Clydebank very well. Still don`t know how you could buy a rickett ? What is it ? Ricketts the bone condition, on the other hand I know a bit about, sadly in this affluent country.

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" Oh would some god the giftie gie us, to see oorselves as others see us"

Its ca'ed a mirror ye higgereant wee banananana man

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I don't actually think you can say "kids are good" or "kids are bad". Some are good and some are bad. They have sadly grown up with the attitude that they deserve things just cause they breathe. Well, over here they have. They will be shocked to find out it's not true. :lol:

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I don't actually think you can say "kids are good" or "kids are bad". Some are good and some are bad. They have sadly grown up with the attitude that they deserve things just cause they breathe. Well, over here they have. They will be shocked to find out it's not true. :lol:

Yeah same here. "Its our right" is a favourite whine.

Its not only Vietnam we should have pulled out of!!!!!!!

Luckily most kids are "good" when the chips are down.

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The "smogs" had just about disappeared by the mid 1960s with the Clean Air Acts and the decline of coal for heating. Although I can remember the coal men delivering and the coal yards at Partick & Kelvinbridge.

I also remember waking up to ice on the inside of the windows. My mother used to heat the kitchen in the morning by putting the oven on.

At school we would all be sitting on the radiators when we could (in winter).

As for the belt ... lets not start that one again.

'Coal briquettes and firewood'. That came outta nowhere from my rapidly failing synapses. Twas the cry of the traders on our street.

I too recall ice on the inside of the windows of our house in Knightswood. Nice patterns! My ma used to get up extra-early in winter to put on the paraffin heater in us kids' room. We used to waft our school uniform in front of it for a minute or three so's not to be putting on frozen-solid clothes. Sometimes we scorched them by accident. :-)

Never did us any harm, blablablabla......well frankly that view can get tae. It was miserable.

Does anyone else here have coal fires? They're helluva messy and pretty darned time-consuming but there's nowt like them for heating up a house. Plus you pay out less for your central heating of a winter.

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Smokeless zone where I live so very few have coal fires, I believe smokeless coal is a very expensive method of heating. I have gas central heating with a pretendy living flame coal fire in sitting room. Toasty, atmospheric with no ashes to clear out. :lol: Scared to know about the effect on the environment in case I have to do something about it :oops:

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I remember in Glasgow lying in bed freezing with ice on windows then at 4:30am hearing a quiet wumff at the central heating boiler cut in then the click click of the pipes starting to heat. Bedrooms were set to the wonderful temp of 55F & living rooms to 65F.

Gas pretendy fire in lounge.

Now house temp is set at 70F in winter & 75F in summer

Also remember taking shirrt off washing line & it was frozen as stiff as a board. Now we hang out week's washing & by time you have finished hanging it out you can start at the beginning bringing it in 8)

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