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Pat's Guide to Glasgow West End
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rolo tomassi

Late night drinking in the 70s

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Anyone here remember when last orders were called at 9.45? Seems totally daft now, doesn't it?

What did you do after? Get the bus home, watch crap Saturday night telly wi your parents and heat up a Vesta curry for a treat whilst tuning in to FAB 208?

Or

Pitch in for a cairry-oot of Hirondelle and/or terrible beer and then go wandering round the WE listening oot for a partay? Then blagged your way in only to find a bunch of sh*t-faced hippies frae the Art School?

Why do I ask? Cos the wean's starting to claim her independence and I'm now facing all those uncomfortable questions like 'but WHY won't you let me...' and 'what did YOU do when YOU were young?'

Oh dear....... :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:

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A mixture of the two posts above, a carry out and a party, one of our frineds had a really understanding maw and paw, who let us party in their converted basement every weekend. After that era moved onto a curry take away to share for two, and I remember it was either a beef or lamb curry, mild, medium vindaloo. None of all the choices we have now

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The "70s" and pubs shutting at 21:45, you lucky lucky bstrds

Here in couthy Greenock the y only started opening after 23:59 on a Saturday in 1987, and then only a select few, local lishenshing board wouldn't allow it before because and I quote "It stops people from getting up on time to go to church" if the lishenshed premises were open later.

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Guest westender

It's a difficult one. Of course your parents worried about what you were doin when you were younger, rolo, and gave you all sorts of static and cramped your style, just the same way kiddo thinks you're doin to her now.....

....But the fact is, the world is a far more dark and dangerous place now than it was then. You were much less likely to come to harm.

And drink and drugs were not such an alluring religion for young folk then. The idea was they were tolols used to the end of the having of fun; now the fun part seems to be incidental to the serious work of getting smashed & stoned out of yer face.

Scotland is awash wi unwanted and unplanned pregancies, conceived in alcohol and drug fuelled, unpleasant oblivion. The hospitals can't cope with the amount of drink fuelled disasters that roll into A+E every single weekend.

It doesn't matter either if you're not looking for trouble. In this city, trouble is everywhere. Flows as freely as the drink.

IMO

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Guest thomas

Just recently a 'Bankie' was telling me the story of the differences in 'opening hours' within licensed premises, especially between Glasgow and Clydebank.

Apparently just along the road at Yoker there are two pubs, one in Yoker, Clydebank and the other in Yoker, Glasgow where the boundary meets. According to my source, the Clydebank side used to close at 9pm and all the folks would run across the road to the Glasgow side for the 9:30 closing.

As far as I am lead to believe this was as far back as the 70's. Other than that, I do remember a few select pubs in the West End that would from time to time, with 'special regular customers' have a 'lock in'.

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Guest westender

Contact Ian Brady for more details about this.

That all you got?

You're a fukcwit. Get an argument before you try to argue with me.

The reason he's in jile for the rest of his natural is that what he did was SO much of an abomination at the time and was sentenced accordingly.

Meanwhile the bad wee ###### who murdered a toddler in Liverpool are already out - (and there are a ton of similar cases I could cite, and you know it) and our taxes are paying for their anonimity.

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The reason he's in jile for the rest of his natural is that what he did was SO much of an abomination at the time and was sentenced accordingly.

Wan hunner percent correct. So sad that eejits like Lord Longford get nashnul notoriety fur bein diddies by assossyayshin wi' this case.

Eekwally sad that eejits like Dex get local notoriety fur bein diddies via the same route.

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Peter Manuel, anyone.

If one actually does read the Daily Record of any era one will find depending on one's outlook that the world has always been a dangerous place. What has changed is if you murder your child you are more likely to be charged.

Peter Tobin was wandering about then, so was Angus Sinclair. I wonder if they wore rose tinted specs like some of the pre senile contributors on here.

Let's get backing to talking about walking dogs.

Here's the edited part.

Seriously tell her to keep out of cars driven by other young people. Deaths on the road involving young people have increased. That has to be balanced against figures of yesteryear before MOTs and drink driving laws.

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Actually, my post was supposed to just be a bit of fun, but I see it's turned into something else now, well, so be it :lol::D:D

I don't recall saying we were totally safe out and about as teens in the 70s. In fact almost every woman I know had to cope wi some sort of harassment, some incidents worse than others. There was also a bit of fisticuffs between young men who seemed to enjoy battering lumps out of each other.

BUT, I do think Westie's perception of changing times is quite accurate. The easy availability of vast vats of drink and mountains of drugs IS more prevalent now, there's no doubt about it, and I suspect it does lead to more incidence of harm.

All you can really do, IMVHO, is try to let your kids know that you understand what CAN happen and how to deal with it, if it does.

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Peter Manuel, anyone.

If one actually does read the Daily Record of any era one will find depending on one's outlook that the world has always been a dangerous place. What has changed is if you murder your child you are more likely to be charged.

Peter Tobin was wandering about then, so was Angus Sinclair. I wonder if they wore rose tinted specs like some of the pre senile contributors on here.

Let's get backing to talking about walking dogs.

Here's the edited part.

Seriously tell her to keep out of cars driven by other young people. Deaths on the road involving young people have increased. That has to be balanced against figures of yesteryear before MOTs and drink driving laws.

Don't you mean "rose west tinted specs"

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I'm not sure I fully agree with this. We had plenty of access to drink. As we had less money, it was not so much the "designer" drinks of today but more of the snakebites and cheap wine. But we still got p!ssed up on a regular basis (the home brew left you feeling numb rather than p!ssed). Drugs were plentiful in the West End too; mainly dope and acid. The others that you see today were not around which is probably a good thing.

Perhaps the perception is because Byres Rd. is more of a destination today than it was then.

Agree with TOG, I think the difference might be that there appears to be more heroin use about. I don't remember years ago seeing the junkies with the wee turkey walk and nasal voice floating about as they do now.

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Seriously tell her to keep out of cars driven by other young people. Deaths on the road involving young people have increased. That has to be balanced against figures of yesteryear before MOTs and drink driving laws.

I think this is very good advice from Dex. 6,000 teens die a year in this country. Mostly in cars with other teens and often with drinking involved.

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Lots of rural areas in Ireland and Scotland, and possibly other countries, have a major problem with road accidents, young drivers and alcohol consumption.

Also lots of accidents after the transport system shuts down.

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Guest onyirtodd

Lots of rural areas in Ireland and Scotland, and possibly other countries, have a major problem with road accidents, young drivers and alcohol consumption.

Also lots of accidents after the transport system shuts down.

It only really becomes a problem when a driver, young, drunk, whatever injures or kills someone not actually travelling in their vehicle.

Up to that point it's pretty much a self/ friend inflicted injury.

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It only really becomes a problem when a driver, young, drunk, whatever injures or kills someone not actually travelling in their vehicle.

Up to that point it's pretty much a self/ friend inflicted injury.

Unfortunately the pain caused by fatalities and severe injury can have a wide reaching effect, for example, leaving children without a parent and families in grief.

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Guest onyirtodd

Unfortunately the pain caused by fatalities and severe injury can have a wide reaching effect, for example, leaving children without a parent and families in grief.

It's still pretty much a self/ friend inflicted injury.

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It's still pretty much a self/ friend inflicted injury.

And it's still pretty much a tremendous problem.

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Guest onyirtodd

And it's still pretty much a tremendous problem.

Not at all.

Get drunk? Get behind the wheel of a car or get into a car driven by a drink?

No loss to society provided nobody not actually travelling in their vehicle is killed or injured. I'll turn a blind eye to the loss of a tree or a dyke to improve the gene pool.

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Drinking and driving is totally irresponsible but a life lost is always a sad thing.

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Guest onyirtodd

Drinking and driving is totally irresponsible but a life lost is always a sad thing.

Normally you'd be right but we're talking about a drunk driver or someone daft enough to get in the car with a drunk driver. Sad perhaps but no great loss.

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Yeah ... but you also have to consider the cost to society of feeding, clothing, housing and educating (sic) a loser.

You can be a loser at 17 and a winner at 20.

Unfortunately many young people lose their lives in car accidents - they are not losers. Just foolish. I don't know many people who could in all honesty say that they have never made a mistake - for example taking a lift from someone who has drank too much.

Wouldn't consider it now but in my teens I was more reckless.

Looks like some folk on here were born sensible.

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We have same prob as Peony long distances & FA public transport ... 30% of all road fatalities are men between 17 & 24

Here You get a probationary licence , must show a "P" plate on care, which restricts speed & number of passengers you can carry until you are 21.

Blood alcohol limit of a "P" plater is 0

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