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Pat's Guide to Glasgow West End
Joeboy

70's, 80's West End Nostalgia Photos...

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Does anyone have pictures of Byres Road during the 1970s / 1980s era ?If so, would you upload them on here ? Are there any pictures of this sort already on here somewhere ?

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I find nostalgia materials fascinating, moreover, I'm trying to fill in the blanks of my childhood 'geographical memories'. For instance, I remember that Tinderbox was formerly the Royal Bank, Pink Poodle was a maintenance Store, there was an RS MColl somewhere around there too, then there was a Butchers where the florists is now, so on and so forth.

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Not bad, but I'm looking for 70s/80s era snaps and lots. I cannot believe there aren't any online.

So sorry to let you down, JB :oops: Why not get up aff yir fat erse and go and look for yirsel? :wink:

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Guest westender

So sorry to let you down, JB :oops: Why not get up aff yir fat erse and go and look for yirsel? :wink:

Haw haw haw.

That's just what I was going to say!!

This bloody electric interweb hing... folk don't know how to dae a damn hing fur themselves these days

http://www.mitchelllibrary.org/vm/

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I find nostalgia materials fascinating, moreover, I'm trying to fill in the blanks of my childhood 'geographical memories'. For instance, I remember that Tinderbox was formerly the Royal Bank, Pink Poodle was a maintenance Store, there was an RS MColl somewhere around there too, then there was a Butchers where the florists is now, so on and so forth.

Uh huh. There was a bank where Tinderbox is now. I don't remember RS McColl on that stretch of the street. There was a butchers near where the flower shop is, or perhaps more closely, the Oxfam music shop.

There was a hardware shop there some time ago. I'm intrigued by your use of 'maintenance store'. Your IP doesn't indicate that you're based in the UK or Canada. Interested to know why you used that lingo? You been away and come back again?

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That would be Tully's. RS McColl used to be next to the chip shop where that cafe (can't remember the name) is now.

Opposite, next to Woolies and the Gardens cafe, there was Thompsons the Barbers. There was also a driving school where my parents learned to drive in a Morris Minor. Anyone remember the name (it might have been McKinley but I'm not sure)? On the other side of Woolies was Napiers and the Post Office.

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So sorry to let you down, JB :oops: Why not get up aff yir fat erse and go and look for yirsel? :wink:

I hink ye'll agree tha jining a west end site, tae find piktures o' Byres Road an asking locals( weel thaes that are acktewl locals an no hingers awn) wheres a guid place tae luik is tae "look fer yirsel" :shock: :shock: :shock:

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St George's Cross subway station being built in 1970

St.jpg

This station was opened in 1896 by the Glasgow Central Railway, a line sponsored by the Caledonian Railway to construct an underground route through the city centre. This station was on the western section of the route, which terminated at Maryhill.

This shows the booking office, supported on columns above the platforms, and linked to them by the covered stairways seen here. In the foreground is a car park created on the site of the former goods yard, closed in 1964. The passenger station had been closed since 1952.

The prosperity of this station, and of others to the west and north, was badly affected by the electrification of the Glasgow tramways in 1901-2. This one also suffered from competition from the Glasgow Subway, which opened in 1895. The building seen here was demolished in 1969 following a fire in 1968.

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The first-high-level bridge on this site was opened in 1836 as part of the Great Western Road, a new route into Glasgow City Centre from the north west, suitable for carriages, and replacing an old winding route along what are now North and South Woodside roads and a low-level bridge here.

This shows the bridge which replaced the 1836 structure in 1889-91 to designs by Bell & Miller, engineers. Like their Partick Bridge of 1877-78 it has cast-iron arches. In this case the arches support two large-diameter water mains as well as the carriageway. This view is from the south-east.

Since this photograph was taken, the ground in the foreground, formerly part of Kelvinbridge Goods & Mineral Depot, has become the site of the surface building of Kelvinbridge Underground Station, with an escalator link to the deck of the bridge.

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Escalators being installed in Kelvinbridge Underground, 1978

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Kelvinbridge Station, Glasgow - under construction in 1978

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The first day of Kelvinbridge car park: free travel on the underground for patrons of the new car park, 1965

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Have never seen this particular view before:

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The entrance to Partick Cross subway station in Dalcross pass, 1965

Partic-1.jpg

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Guest onyirtodd

Great photos HH but if you going to show a car park can we have a wee warning at the top of the post? Fair took my breath away, so it did :oops:

But thanks none the less :wink:

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Guest westender

Yep, great pics - thanks HH. Hunter Tomison - the name's still on the floor in the doorway to the shop. And I think, possibly on the doorhandles as well.

(What charity shop is that now? - Help the Aged? PDSA?)

It looked like a shop along the lines of Kelvin House; packed to the rafters with good stuff and solid foundation garments. ("Clydebuilt", as me da calls me ma's underthingmies)

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(What charity shop is that now? - Help the Aged? PDSA?)

SENSE?

Dont be a pain in the arse Rico!

Drop it.

You're the pain in the ass Oz. You're only a mod. They come, they go and your time must be just about up,. And BTW it's Lynnski's job to look after the bag lady.

She challenged me to prove she'd said it was illegal after doing a quick edit to her original post. Of course you mods don't know that can be done without it leaving a "this post has been edited by L I A R" or whatever user name the poster has.

She's been caught by her trick of quoting everything in her replies and by some one who knows his way around message boards.

article-0-0561D9CE000005DC-444_468x350.jpg

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Great pics HH! Particularly evocative cos I lived in Otago St in the late 70s.. it's great to see the old (I assume Station building) behind the Philly. I never saw that in real life, I wonder when it was demolished?

See the one where the new station's being built? Was that really as late as 1978? Perhaps memory fails but we used to totter home to Otago St over the station car park from *he ***blet around that time, and the station was up and working then. Maybe stuff just got built quicker in them days..

Nice to see my mate's house and garden intact on the banks of the Kelvin there right next to the tall tenement. Poor guy lost half his inheritance when the river burst its banks a few years later, taking most of the garden with it... :cry:

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Guest westender

Nice to see my mate's house and garden intact on the banks of the Kelvin there right next to the tall tenement. Poor guy lost half his inheritance when the river burst its banks a few years later, taking most of the garden with it... :cry:

:o

It's also the house of my boyfriend's dad's, erm, bidey in (except she bides oot) (and he lives a few doors away)

One of the oldest houses in the west end - dates from the 1700s.

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Aerial view of Glasgow University and Kelvinbridge. 27th August 1942

Ariel.jpg

This vertical aerial photograph of the area around Glasgow University was taken during World War II by the Royal Air Force.

Glasgow University moved to the Gilmorehill area of Glasgow from a site in the High Street. Some of the 19th-century tenements seen in this view have since been demolished.

Vertical air photographs were taken by the RAF during photographic-reconnaissance training. These photographs were used to ascertain the accuracy of the pilot in photographing the target and to aid the skills of photographic interpretation.

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Heck HH, they musta waited all year to get a day when they're was but the merest puff of cloud above wur west end!

I couldnae get my bearings there for a while, but it was the curve of Belmont Crescent, top right, plus the River Kelvin and the old railway going underneath the bridge that kept me right.

Great pic, ta!

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Well spotted TOG, you have very good eyesight for your age :o

This will make an excellent addition to the "Glasgow Air Raids" Thread over on HG, cheers.

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