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tamd

James Joyce

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Didn't know what tags meant and  typed F. W. which was not accepted. First year English, T. A. was Sister Jerome and the prof was  Schweigal; almost certain that spelling deserves the red line. Lectures were done on TV. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man was my introduction to Joyce. A little better than fifty years has passed but memory not too bad. First assignment we were told to write anything we wished as long as "it" pertained to what we had taken up until then: I received an F. I talked to the Nun and she said, "you wrote a play". And I had, had Prince Hal discussing with Falstaff, four of the short stories we had taken. I told her that she had said we could write whatever we and she told me that she assumed anyone attending a university would have known that the assignment called for an essay....the prof told her she should allow me to re-write.

Portrait was somewhat forgettable for me but because Joyce was held in such high regard I later tried Ulysses, gave up and made a half-hearted attempt to read F.W. Eventually, probably some years later, I read his short stories; "The Dubliners"....not a big fan of short stories but I remember liking a couple by Joyce but much preferred F. Scott Fitzgerald.

At some point during class it was mentioned that three "artist's" changed the whole direction in whatever field they practised.  Igor Stravinsky, music, Pablo Picasso, artist and James Joyce, literature: cannae see it in any of them. The F.W. copy I have has a forward by "Seamus Deane", general editor for the works of Joyce in Penguin; and he is Keough Professor of Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana.

F.W. is supposed to tell the history of Ireland, it contains a lot of sex and I couldn't find either. And talking to many people I know I have discovered only two people who have read F.W. cover to cover. Both read it because it was assgned and one, when I asked what it was all about, said, "haven't a clue" and he graduated with honours,went on to earn an MBA....so nothing wrong with his head. The other is a retired school teacher who finished grade 9 when he was twelve years old. His university degree had a double major and, difficult to believe but his double major was Latin and Greek; he now speaks six or seven languages....clearly not an idiot. I told him that I was giving F.W. andother try and he said, "why, I had to take it and would never have read the damned thing if I had had a choice.

I don't think I will try again with F.W. because a Hans C. Anderson children's story comes to mind....the ending tells that a child recognized that the King was naked.....and....reading that Joyce took fourteen (or so) years to write his masterpiece makes me think that he was very fortuante to have a patron, a lady who supported him and his family...and...he had a brother named Stanislaus and THAT surprised me....

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Not sure what F.W. stands for, tam.  Loved The Dubliners and the film The Dead with Anjelica Huston is fabulous. 

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Finnegans Wake: evidently it was first published in a, perhaps more than one, monthly publications under the heading, "work in progress". Morley Callaghan, a Canadian writer wrote, "That Summer in Paris" and the "summer" was the time when Joyce was working on Finnegans Wake. Morley and his wife met with  Joyce and his missus and Morley shines the light on a side of Joyce often overlooked.

I will look for "The Dead"....Anjelica, one of those performers who never disappoint....

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Three to nine inches of snow due today and I am/might be getting a lift to Chatham for a breathing test. Chatham has a tremendous used book shop and this thread has made it obvious that I need to re-read, "The Dubliner's"....it's been so long ago that I keep thinking that the book was titled, "Dubliners" as opposed to "The Dubliners".

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Lily, the Caretaker's daughter is now in my kindle....Dubliners '99cents" dlievered.

 

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18 hours ago, tamd said:

Lily, the Caretaker's daughter is now in my kindle....Dubliners '99cents" dlievered.

 

Well done. That's a deal.  Been snowing here a lot too but mainly flurries.  My sister is keeping me up to date with the deep snow you've got in Ontario.

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Sam that is too bad, one of my daughters bought the kindle for me and I took to it right away but I do admit to visiting Book Brothers often. It is, for me, typical of many second hand book shops, a couple of weeks ago I picked up a Rankin, was sure I had read everything he wrote but no, this one is new to me.

Pat, the snow here is now past a joke. When I walk, as I need to because of the car wreck, I cross a small field along one of it's edges and because of the snow I have to stop at least once in order to do a bit of deep breathing.....and it has been quite cold though not as bad as what we experienced in Ottawa.

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Joyce:- typing "Joyce" is to remind me to stay on topic....will give it a go....Had to open the kindle, couldn't remember the title of the story I am reading, one from "Dubliners", The Dead I hope. Took a few pages but when Gabriel and Gretta are ready to retire, YES, Joyce will get yah, I hope. I have read "That Summer in Paris", Callaghan, it is the summer when Callaghan met James and Mrs. Joyce....(cannae remember her fist name). Morley speaks of the last four paragraphs of Ulysees, describes them as a soliloquy and writes that after meeting Mrs. Joyce he saw her, in those paragraphs the inspiration for Molly Bloom's words: I see Gretta as Mrs, Joyce, a woman much loved by her husband.

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Nora was Joyce's wife's name.  Love the end of Ulysees.

 

On 2/11/2018 at 2:14 AM, samscafeamericain said:

cannot stand the concept of kindle; books need to be tangible and experienced

Samsc, I much prefer reading a book than reading on Kindle but it's very handy for travelling and we are bursting at the seams with books in the house. Bookcases are two deep. Sometimes when I am reading a book in the Kindle I forget what the book is called and who the author is.  I also sometimes like to underline or take some notes in the margin. The Kindle can be irritating.

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Also dries the eyes, the entire experience, for me is so different. Maybe its because work involves staring at bloody computer screens that the thought of doing so when reading a book fills me with horror

 

Ned Ludd Rules 

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I'm working most of the time on computer too, samsc. There's not the emotional thrill of a book but convenience comes into it.  Also fabulous for anyone housebound as they can peruse the booklists and purchase just about anything without going over the door.  

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a wee bitty learnin....a "Joyce" character says a ""deoc an dorius" and my immediate thought was to the song, the song sung, perhaps spoken, many times at 4A Ruthven Place, Perth. The Scots spelling is a wee bit different and on a personal note, by the time I was leaving any festive occasion, the "wee wifey" would have been long out of mind.

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Don't think you'll find anything about the braw bricht moonlicht nicht, tam. 

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I enjoyed ALL the short stories of Dubliners. I have one aim re Joyce. That's to get to the end of 'Ulysses' before I shuffle off this mortal coil. Every time I start to read it I get a little further on! can anyone confirm an anecdote i heard many years ago? After 'Finnegan's Wake' was published Joyce's wife's comment was, 'When are you going to write a book we can read?'

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The short stories aren't a task. The Dubliners will always be my favourite story. Full of fabulous description, great characters and my favourite: emotion. 

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