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Pat

Childhood medicine

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Every morning before school all the weans in our house were lined up for their doses of rosehip syrup and before bedtime we got our malt extract.

I'm pretty sure these healthcare products were issued free on the NHS as they were picked up at the local clinic.

Does anyone else remember or were you a cod liver oil and orange juice wean?

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Cod liver oil and orange juice for us. The first was dreadful and absolute cruelty giving weans that on a spoon but the orange juice was great and you don't seem to get it like that these days. I remember gathering rosehips and taking them into school.

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The main ingredient of rosehip syrup was sugar,and great it tasted too,but dissolved your teeth in the imbibing.

Codliver oil was vile,and the orange juice as I remember was some kind of bright orange concentrate.I think you are right in saying it was free.

I remember having pneumonia as a 5 year old and getting" M and B bottle".It saved my life,and Churchills too and was a sulphonamide that pre-dated antibiotics.I remember being in bed with three layers of clothes,the fever breaking, and my wee handknit fairisle cardi. sticking to me,and my hair clapped into my head with perspiration.There was a coal fire in the bedroom to keep the temperature up,and whilst it all seems primitive now,it certainly worked.

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I've never heard of M & B but it seems to have been hailed as a wonder drug way back in 1938, willie. Very glad it worked for you.

According to Time Magazine" "

Among the diseases conquered by sulfanilamide are puerperal sepsis (childbed fever), gonorrhea, meningitis, and streptococcus sore throat. Last week in The Lancet Dr. Sidney Campbell Dyke, consulting pathologist at the Royal Hospital at Wolverhampton, and his assistant, Dr. G. C. K. Reid, reported that tablets of a new sulfanilamide compound, M. & B. 693, short for 2-(para-aminobenzenesulphonamido) pyridine, had brought about a "speedy recovery" in eight cases of lobar pneumonia.

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M&B stood for May and Baker,the manufacturer, an old and much respected pharma.company,and the very organisation I started with in 1979,having left the fashion industry,and started a 30 year career in pharmaceuticals.A quantum leap if ever there was one!

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That certainly was a leap, willie, but I feel assured that you would continue to retain your dapper image in your new walk of life.

Back to the childhood ailments. I don't know what happened to the school nurse. I remember being tucked up on a few occasions under a big red blanket when I became unwell at school. Very comforting.

Something else I remember clearly was having a poultice applied - sometimes sugar based and sometimes bread. The idea was to draw out poison. They definitely worked but are they every used these days? I don't think so – more likely to scoot off to the doc for some antibiotics.

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I can see poultices making a comeback given the number of diseases becoming antibiotic resistant,due in part to every cough and cold being prescribed those drugs.

As they say, if you treat a cold it lasts a week,if you dont,it lasts 7 days.

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I usually manage to treat a cold with Vit C, Echinecea and Ribena, willie.

I think ready-made frozen poutices could be the way forward for treating cuts and scrapes. :lol:

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"PatWils Deep Frozen Poultice Company" is totally inspiring.

We can do a luxury version for Westenders,and Newtonmearnsers,using only artisan bread,and just your bog standard "value bread"for poorer Partick/Queens Park denizens.For the weight conscious,we will use Nimble.Sugars can be tailored to suit too.

Lets also point out that nothing need go to waste with our poultices,and after use,a quick rinse under the tap,and you have the basis for a hearty bread and butter pudding with the addition of a few sultanas."We cure and feed" could be our strapline!

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:lol: :lol: 57 varieties, willie. Although, a doze of something else might be required after that dessert.

I'll need to do some more research. I have the feeling that baking soda may have featured somewhere and I think one concoction was soap and sugar. Probably carbolic. :)

I would love to see liberty bodices re-introduced, harper. Those fleecy wee wraparounds with satin ribbons were lovely. You felt quite precious when wearing that garment. Far more attractive than thermals.

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Vick vapour rub was a cure all too,sticking to everything including your liberty bodice,and those candy striped flanalette sheets out of Brentfords Nylons.You got sucked into that shop as you passed with the amount of static all that nylon generated!

Does anyone remember Zubes" tickly throat lozenges"?They came in a round tin,tasted vile,and were advertised with the jingle "Zubes,Zubes,Zubes are good for your tubes".They didnt do a blind bit of good of course.

Remember too you used to see all those wee waens at school wearing those terrible N.H.S.round glasses with a piece of grubby Elastoplast over one lense because they had "a lazy eye?"

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Those pink specs were an eyesore right enough, willie. 'Lazy eye' - what an expression. Sounds like such a condemnation. I remember the Zubes advert too but cannot conjure up an image of the lozenge. However, Vick in its wee navy blue jar is always on my medicine shelf.

I think my mother's favourite medicine for us was Milk of Magnesia. I think she had the idea that it cured all remedies or maybe she was wiser than that and thought that it would have a palliative effect and do no harm. I think Calpol is viewed much in the same way these days.

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I wiz that wean! The patches and the glasses worked. :lol: I wonder how they treat that condition now, you never see kids with patches nowadays.

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:lol: Glasses? I was the wean who went to the speech therapist, who came to the school. Just two of us, me and a wee boy, were called out of the class. Embarrassing. Anyway my burr was eventually removed. It had to be resurrected later on when I started to learn French. That fairly threw the teacher. My accent was superb but my knowledge zilch.

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I remember we used to get syrup of figs. I could not tell you what it was supposed to fix.

:lol: I think it's handy if you have a touch of constipation, rory. I haven't heard of it for years. I used to think it sounded very exotic because in our house we had Californian Syrup of Figs.

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