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Virgin Galactic Spaceship Shaping Up


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Not me. Even if it was as safe as a normal plane journey and I had a spare 10 million quid, I wouldn't pay the £125,000 asking price for a trip to the 'edge of space' for 5 minutes of weightlessness. Three days of mental and physical fitness testing is pretty off putting, too.

Now, a journey around the moon and back would get me interested. It'll happen some day, no doubt.

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Not me. Even if it was as safe as a normal plane journey and I had a spare 10 million quid, I wouldn't pay the £125,000 asking price for a trip to the 'edge of space' for 5 minutes of weightlessness. Three days of mental and physical fitness testing is pretty off putting, too.

Now, a journey around the moon and back would get me interested. It'll happen some day, no doubt.

I'm no goin' either, yonza. Not even round the moon. Not even if they pay me. I nearly had a nervous breakdown going up on the cable car in Funchal. :rolleyes:

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OMG, I'd be elbowing dignitries, royalty and pensioners oot the road to get to the top of that queue. I'd be there in a heartbeat. I am well gel. sad.gif

If I ever win a seat in a raffle your name's on it. :rolleyes:

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Some day, maybe 200 years from now, some billionaire adventurer will go sailing on one of Titan's methane lakes.

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ScienceDaily (Mar. 17, 2011) — As spring continues to unfold at Saturn, April showers on the planet's largest moon, Titan, have brought methane rain to its equatorial deserts, as revealed in images captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. This is the first time scientists have obtained current evidence of rain soaking Titan's surface at low latitudes.

Extensive rain from large cloud systems, spotted by Cassini's cameras in late 2010, has apparently darkened the surface of the moon. The best explanation is these areas remained wet after methane rainstorms. The observations released in the journal Science, combined with earlier results in Geophysical Research Letters last month, show the weather systems of Titan's thick atmosphere and the changes wrought on its surface are affected by the changing seasons.

"It's amazing to be watching such familiar activity as rainstorms and seasonal changes in weather patterns on a distant, icy satellite," said Elizabeth Turtle, a Cassini imaging team associate at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md., and lead author of the study. "These observations are helping us to understand how Titan works as a system, as well as similar processes on our own planet."

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