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Pat's Guide to Glasgow West End
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HollowHorn

Interesting Graves, Headstones & the like.

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Cathcart, Stan Laurel's Mother's Grave: (Unmarked, around where the flowers are)

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Benny Lynch, St. Kentigerns, Glasgow:

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St. Kentigerns, Glasgow:

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Sighthill, Glasgow:

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Falkirk Old Parish Church:

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Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh:

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Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh:

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Great stuff, HH. Quite a mixture.

On Billy Kemp's gravestone in Old Kilpatrick Cemetery there is a link to the website one of his four son's created in his memory. He was an Independent Local Councilor, who did a lot for the village. A very well liked and respected man.

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Guest Mr Harper

From Kensal Green Cemetery, yesterday. Was at a funeral and had a wander in the softy southern snow.

Sorry chaps, they'll all want one of these now.

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Love in a mist.

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This Webpage is dedicated to “Blondin”, Funambulus,

Equilibrist (Tightrope-Walker), Aerialist

and Acrobat Extraordinaire

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Mr.H, very moody photos of Kensal Green. Have you seen this interesting site on London's nooks & crannies?

See Here:

Cimetiere De Saint-Vincent. Paris:

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Père Lachaise, Paris:

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Oscar Wilde, Père Lachaise, Paris:

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I love the little kisses:

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Père Lachaise, Paris:

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Edith Piaf, Père Lachaise, Paris:

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Joseph Spinelli, Père Lachaise, Paris:

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Balloonist and aeronautics engineer Joseph-Eustache Croce-Spinelli was born on this day in 1843 in Dordogne, France. Croce-Spinelli was deeply interested in manned flight and had not only made several balloon expeditions but had published articles on propeller design when on April 15, 1875, with Gaston Tissandier and an assistant named Henri-Theodore Sivel, he flew to 29,000 feet over India in the helium-balloon Zenith -- short of the altitude record set by James Glaisher and Henry Coxwell. Although the men had been advised by Paris physiologist Paul Bert about the supplemental oxygen required at such altitude, in the excitement they failed to heed the advice, and Croce-Spinelli and Sivel asphyxiated in the inhospitably thin air. Tissandier miraculously survived to tell the tale.

Croce-Spinelli's claim to fame, however, stems not so much from his contributions to aeronautics but from the design of his much-visited tomb at Pere Lachaise in Paris: the monument displays lifesized effigies of Croce-Spinelli and Sivel lying side-by-side, holding hands, bare-chested and otherwise covered in a shroud. The sculpture is obviously a tribute to their comradeship, but some have asserted, without further evidence, that Croce-Spinelli and Sivel were gay lovers. Heroic death in the company of one's peers was a heady theme for the post-Romantic French. Who's to say?

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation, Paris:

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The Mémorial de la Déportation is a memorial to the 200,000 people deported from Vichy France to the Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War. It is in Paris, France on the site of a former morgue, underground behind Notre Dame on Île de la Cité. It was designed by French modernist architect, writer, teacher, and town planner Georges-Henri Pingusson and opened in 1962.

A circular plaque on the floor of the underground chamber is inscribed: "They descended into the mouth of the earth and they did not return." Along both walls of the narrow chamber are 200,000 crystals with light shining through meant to symbolize each of the deportees who died in the concentration camps.

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Maggs, I stumbled on that wee Quaker graveyard a few years ago. It is a wee piece of history which I am glad was saved when all the "new build" was done. A tranquil spot despite being so near 2 very busy roads.

So small, very easily missed Hingmie

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From Gary, with permission:

Detail of the stone in Glasgow Catherdral's graveyard, showing the burying place of Mrs Mary Hill of Gairbraid, after whom the Burgh of Maryhill was named.

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Guest thomas

Sometimes it isn't the 'Neds' surprisingly, one independent memorial stone mason (before the co-op bought them out) told me of stone weakness and erosion. Often stones would be placed in cemeteries in direct wind paths...whatever that meant! Through time any weakness in the stone, however small would cause arms, legs, faces, wings and others to fall off stones. Water also has a big part to play but of course the best one is the Neds who usually find someway of destroying a monumental stone....

I wanted to include a pic of the grave of the man who invented the hokey cokey, trouble was they got his left leg in....

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I wondered if it might have been Coghill's grave, I know that is where he died so I had a quick Google:

Well done HH you know your history

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Very diverse range of graves in Old Kilpatrick Cemetery including modern graves with website addresses:

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hi,

i am absolutely fascinated by graveyards in general,but am ashamed to say i havn't been to the necropolis in glasgow yet.must correct that soon whilst still on this side of the divide.

on a trip to l.a.we went to westwood memorial park to see marylin monroes grave.its one of those lairs where the coffin is put into a wall with an engraved plaque on the front.the right hand corner is worn away, and the marble quite stained where visitors touch the plaque,and of course there is a little conical shaped bronze vase containing a single red rose freshly changed every couple of days by a legacy of joe di maggio.its a lovely quiet little corner of the cemetry,and whats interesting too are the names of the incumbents of the crypts surrounding marylins grave..they seem just ordinary everyday people who would never have known that in death they would be near neighbours of a famous movie star.death the great leveler and all that,

willie.x.

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hi,

i am absolutely fascinated by graveyards in general,but am ashamed to say i havn't been to the necropolis in glasgow yet.must correct that soon whilst still on this side of the divide.

on a trip to l.a.we went to westwood memorial park to see marylin monroes grave.its one of those lairs where the coffin is put into a wall with an engraved plaque on the front.the right hand corner is worn away, and the marble quite stained where visitors touch the plaque,and of course there is a little conical shaped bronze vase containing a single red rose freshly changed every couple of days by a legacy of joe di maggio.its a lovely quiet little corner of the cemetry,and whats interesting too are the names of the incumbents of the crypts surrounding marylins grave..they seem just ordinary everyday people who would never have known that in death they would be near neighbours of a famous movie star.death the great leveler and all that,

willie.x.

That's very touching, Willie. Get yourself up to the Necropolis but go during the day as it can be creepy and dangerous at night. I don't just mean the ghosties.

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Hollowhorn was interested in so many things. Ironically I was thinking about his fascination with graveyards and the great photographs he took. I'm glad we still have thread on the site that he started. I always thought I would see him again.

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