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Hingmie

Banned books

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I was in the Mitchell during the week and maybe some librarian has been reading this but there was a display on "banned Books". It featured controversial books and was titled Burning Books.

Thanks Dex, I might have the opportunity to visit the Mitchell next week an will have a wee browse.

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More recently:

''Madeleine McCann detective loses attempt to overturn book ban''

''Court upholds injunction banning book that claims McCanns were involved in their daughter's disappearance''

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/feb/18/madeleine-mccann-detective-book-ban

A Verdade da Mentira (the truth of the lie) sold over 200,000 copies in Portugal.

It is currently banned, but has been published online along with an English narrated documentry.

http://goncaloamaraltruthofthelie.blogspot.com/

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Ah remember years ago - mair years than ah wid care tae admit - ah read in a newspaper aboot a list o' books banned in America. Nachurly, ah set aboot readin as minny oan the list as ah cood.

Noo, while ah read sevril oan the list postit therr by Lynnski, (Grapes of Wrath, Animal Far, 1984 and Ivan Denisovich tae name but a few), thur wur ithers ah read fae that list long ago which don't appear in the list above.

Like Lynnski, ah also thot The Crucible wiz oan the list, coz it portrayed the McCarthy witch-hunts. Ah'm also convinced that Catcher in the Rye, Catch 22 and Slaughterhouse Five wur oan mah list anaw, as that wiz whit inspired me tae read thum in the furst place.

Ah huv tae say that these remain amongst the bestest books whit ah iver red.

Catcher in the Rye and Catch 22 both on the list, JJ.

Along with a lot of other great books - as you say.

http://classiclit.about.com/od/bannedliteratur1/a/aa_bannedlist.htm

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More recently:

''Madeleine McCann detective loses attempt to overturn book ban''

''Court upholds injunction banning book that claims McCanns were involved in their daughter's disappearance''

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/feb/18/madeleine-mccann-detective-book-ban

A Verdade da Mentira (the truth of the lie) sold over 200,000 copies in Portugal.

It is currently banned, but has been published online along with an English narrated documentry.

http://goncaloamaraltruthofthelie.blogspot.com/

So if it is banned and simultaneously published then the banning counts for nothing?

I would imagine that we will hear more about with regard to further court action.

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More recently:

''Madeleine McCann detective loses attempt to overturn book ban''

''Court upholds injunction banning book that claims McCanns were involved in their daughter's disappearance''

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/feb/18/madeleine-mccann-detective-book-ban

A Verdade da Mentira (the truth of the lie) sold over 200,000 copies in Portugal.

It is currently banned, but has been published online along with an English narrated documentry.

http://goncaloamaraltruthofthelie.blogspot.com/

Thank you, quite an astonishing read. It is very sad to read that the policeman is convinced by the forensics and beyond reasonable doubt that a dead body was in the McCann holiday accommodation.

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Can anyone tell who are the people who decide which books are banned ? Do publishers have to put forward the books to a certain body, in the UK before they can go ahead or is it a case that they put the book into print and then are told it is a " no no" and therefore not allowed to be distributed ? The lists of "banned books" that others have put forward puzzles me as I know that I have read some of them,while still within the education system here in Scotland. Who for example, were the people who banned that book about the McCann's? The article just talks about judges

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Can anyone tell who are the people who decide which books are banned ? Do publishers have to put forward the books to a certain body, in the UK before they can go ahead or is it a case that they put the book into print and then are told it is a " no no" and therefore not allowed to be distributed ? The lists of "banned books" that others have put forward puzzles me as I know that I have read some of them,while still within the education system here in Scotland. Who for example, were the people who banned that book about the McCann's? The article just talks about judges

The Portuguese judge took the decision that the book defamed the McCanns. The McCanns had already been defamed by the press in the UK and successfully sued them. This time they applied for an Injunction to stop further sales of a book which included similar allegations.

The Guardian gives a summary of those allegations. If you really want a copy of that book I'm sure you could find it but the point is if you want published you can be damned. The author could not prove his allegations and lost the case.

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Over here we have no greater guardian of free speech (and reading) than the American Library Association. Here is a little interview about banned book week:

banned book week

A judge giving an injunction to stop printing a book isn't really banning a book. They are saying that what are presented as facts in the book cannot be proven so they must not be printed. Over here books are usually banned as a result of some action by a parental or religious organization. They rarely succeed, except in small, localized ways these days (as in religious schools, etc.).

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Over here we have no greater guardian of free speech (and reading) than the American Library Association. Here is a little interview about banned book week:

banned book week

A judge giving an injunction to stop printing a book isn't really banning a book. They are saying that what are presented as facts in the book cannot be proven so they must not be printed. Over here books are usually banned as a result of some action by a parental or religious organization. They rarely succeed, except in small, localized ways these days (as in religious schools, etc.).

Interesting to hear the views of Loriene Roy, president of the American Library Association, peony.

Particularly on the rationale behind banning a book:

Ms. ROY: There are various reasons why someone might object to a book. It could be sexual content. It could be language. It could be depiction of families. I have a book in our house called "The Stupids Step Out." It's just a funny about a funny family, and the objections to that book were that it just showed parents as being sort of stupid. And kids love humor, and sometimes their humor is different than ours. And that's why that book has been a favorite over time, but also somebody objected to it.

Very difficult job trying to please everyone using a library as values will be so diverse. The main problem seems to arise with regard to what's considered suitable for children and as Ms Roy points out: "what one family finds acceptable will not be what another family finds acceptable."

However, there does seem to be a particular concern regarding sexual issues, language deemed to be offensive and, to a lesser extent, racism.

The 'most challenged books' in America in 2009 were:

1. TTYL; TTFN; L8R, G8R (series), by Lauren Myracle

Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs

2. “And Tango Makes Three” by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson

Reasons: Homosexuality

3. “The Perks of Being A Wallflower,” by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Anti-Family, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide

4. “To Kill A Mockingbird,” by Harper Lee

Reasons: Racism, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

5. Twilight (series) by Stephenie Meyer

Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group

6. “Catcher in the Rye,” by J.D. Salinger

Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

7. “My Sister’s Keeper,” by Jodi Picoult

Reasons: Sexism, Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide, Violence

8. “The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things,” by Carolyn Mackler

Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

9. “The Color Purple,” Alice Walker

Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

10. “The Chocolate War,” by Robert Cormier

Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/jacketcopy/2010/09/banned-books-week.html

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