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Pat's Guide to Glasgow West End
Pat

Scottish Education

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I think this policy is completely balmy. If there is money to be spent, then spend it oh helping babies stay at home - not stuck in some day care facility. I consider 4 a pre-school age, not 2. For goodness sake, let these kids have some unstructured home life.

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With the attacks on child benefit, I think the idea of paying mothers to stay at home, is really not at all likely. That would take a huge change in attitude. Although, it would be fantastic if mothers (or fathers) had the choice. However, a much more expensive option than early years provision - which should be available.

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It's not an issue for mothers who want to stay at home with their kids harper but some are forced into the labour market who don't want to work.

They are rearing the future work force and should be compensated. But fat chance.

If there is an alternative on offer then that is an alterntive solution. For high flat weans at least they have a better chance of gaining social skills and bawling at other weans.

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The same reason some childless couples work to pay tax towards the upkeep and education of your children, Sam... I think that's how it works.

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No, that is different. They are paying towards the greater good, as am I and everyone else paying tax. In fact I may even contribute towards that childless couples health and welfare bills, who know.

My objection was to the phrase 'some mothers being forced back to work who don't want to work'.

I have no problem with people not wanting to work, that's fine, just cut your cloth accordingly. What I do object to, is people who cannot be bothered working and want the state to keep them.

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There you go Sam, you've got the idea.... and I'll be mutcho grateful for all your continuing support when I get to my pension. :P

I share your objection regarding the can't be ersed to work, providing there is no illness, disability, dependents and where there are sustainable jobs paid at a level that people can actually live on.

I'd like to see childcare policies which support parents who want to stay at home with there babbies in the early years and I am sure if all the spending that currently adds up to pre school provision was looked at, alternative choices could be made. My point is, if you are going to spend the money, at least give people some choices, where possible.

I was very lucky when my babbie was born. I had 9 months paid leave before I had to go back. It saddens me to see very young children stuck in day care and sleep deprived parents dropping them there at 8am.

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I didn't work until my kids were at school. I loved being with them and would have found it incredibly difficult to go to work and leave babies. I probably wouldn't have worked until they were much older but went back when the youngest started school because by then I was a lone parent.

It's hard working, rearing children and doing housework. If someone had said – rearing those kids is work enough and you should be paid to do that then I would have thought that very fair and a great option.

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There you go Sam, you've got the idea.... and I'll be mutcho grateful for all your continuing support when I get to my pension. :P

I share your objection regarding the can't be ersed to work, providing there is no illness, disability, dependents and where there are sustainable jobs paid at a level that people can actually live on.

I'd like to see childcare policies which support parents who want to stay at home with there babbies in the early years and I am sure if all the spending that currently adds up to pre school provision was looked at, alternative choices could be made. My point is, if you are going to spend the money, at least give people some choices, where possible.

I was very lucky when my babbie was born. I had 9 months paid leave before I had to go back. It saddens me to see very young children stuck in day care and sleep deprived parents dropping them there at 8am.

I refuse to pay for patronising pensioners

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I only noticed because I did that to Tig a while back and got myself in a right fankle.... he was awfully good natured about it. :P

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There are a lot of barriers to women working and that includes poor child care provision for pre-fives. A lot of women are also in low paid and part time positions because there are no after school servies. This contributes to child poverty. In an ideal world it would be great for children to be at home with their mothers/or fathers but the world does not work like that anymore.

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Proposal that teenagers get an extra hour in bed before they go to school.

"Local councillor Dr Nina Baker said academic research backs her belief there are learning benefits in allowing a later start to account for teenagers' different biological make-up.

The Green Party member has examined academic research that found teenagers require different sleep patterns compared to young children or adults, in order to work at their best."

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/home-news/call-to-let-school-pupils-stay-in-bed-an-extra-hour.21442690?utm_source=headlines&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email%2Balert

This must mean that universities should start at Noon to accommodate partying.

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There's a bit of a stoochie about P1 - P3 class sizes not having reduced class sizes as promised by SNP.

The proportion of pupils being taught in classes of fewer than 18 has fallen to 13%.

The average class size in early-years primary is now 23.2, compared with 22.7 in 2012.

The latter figure doesn't seem all that dramatic and there have been improvements in other areas. Most particularly in the upgrading of buildings. "The proportion of pupils in schools classed as being in good or satisfactory condition has increased from 61% in 2007 to 84% in April 2013." But then there always seems to be more money available for capital projects than for revenue.

There will always be calls for small class sizss and more teachers and SNP are getting hammered for not targets but one statistic that is very encouraging is: "Since 2006-7, exclusions have dropped by 51% and attendance levels are now at 93.6%." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-25332478

So more weans are actually at school where they should be.

At an anecdotal level, and I am always asking my wee grandnieces, my grandson and his big sister, and my pals' kids if they like school, children these days seem to really love school.

What do you think?

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I think the classes should be smaller. I think promises should be kept. That's whit a think.

Ideally, CL. I think they should follow the Finnish model. All this drive for excellence and leaving behind kids from poorer communities could improve matters. You also wonder about the London schools where children do so well. I've watched a few reports on those and it seems to be down to the heidie and the quality of the teachers. But surely they can be watched and emulated.

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