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Gardening & Growing Stuff

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Peony & Wolfie most worthily kicked off what turned into an extended discussion of Growin Things, wi lots of pics, triumphs, and some wailings and gnashings of teeth.

So, We've got a 'weans' topic with pics, and an 'animal friends' topic with pics .....is embdy interested in having a more formal Growin Things topic...?

We've not all got gardens, but it seems lots of us urban and not so urban dwellers are definitely interested in nurturin bits & pieces of nature.

And the best of the summer - and the season of mists and mellow frootfulness - is yet to come....

??

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... And for a kickoff, look at this excellent site I found - Buy British wildflowers to plant in yer garden!

And they have a wee discussion forum!

http://www.wildflowers.co.uk/about.html

Excellent. I love wildflowers. The bees need them.

bizzybizzyfatty.jpg

(I took this pic! :ph34r: )

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... And for a kickoff, look at this excellent site I found - Buy British wildflowers to plant in yer garden!

And they have a wee discussion forum!

http://www.wildflowers.co.uk/about.html

Excellent. I love wildflowers. The bees need them.

bizzybizzyfatty.jpg

(I took this pic! B) )

Nice pic Westie...is the Bee from Effen ;)

Poetry pause - sorry for the deviation...

(Matt McGinn)

He kept bees in the old town of Effen,

An Effen beekeeper was he,

And one day this Effen beekeeper,

Was stung by a big Effen bee.

Now this big Effen beekeeper's wee Effen wife,

For the big Effen polis she ran,

For there's nobody can sort out a big Effen bee,

Like a big Effen polisman can.

This big Effen polisman he did his nut,

And he ran down the main Effen street,

In his hand was a big Effen baton,

He had big Effen boots on his feet.

The polis got hold of this big Effen bee,

And he twisted the Effen bee's wings,

But this big Effen bee got his own back,

for this big Effen bee had two stings.

Now they're both in the Effen museum,

Where the Effen folk often come see,

The remains of the big Effen polis,

Stung to death by the big Effen bee.

That's the end of that wee Effen story,

'Tis an innocent wee Effen tale,

But if you ever tell it in Effen,

You'll end up in the old Effen jail.

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;)

Okay then - 'flooers, froots and poetry annat' then.

From the farmer's market at the weekend... wid ye look at these! Fab.

farmersmarketstrawbs.jpg

farmersmarketstrawbs2.jpg

& my own efforts - the wee Lidl bargains are goin gangbusters. Flowers, leaves and wee nobbly strawbs in abundance - and the stawberry smell filling the room when the sun's out

22ndJuly003-1.jpg

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Nice photies, Westtie. Glad you and lynnski are enjoying your new hobby.

Nothing like it. It's a thrill everytime a seed grows.

I'm tickled pink with my sunflower on the verandah/balcony - it's got one flower and two buds. I've only every had a single flower on my sunflowers before.

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Stopping things growing is my main concern. I've got an ongoing battle with these pesky weeds (rosebay willow herbs). That's no' my garden btw, but it's a pretty close resemblance.

RosebayWillowherb-Chamerionangustifolium2.jpg

I've also got nettles, brambles, reeds, 6 foot thistles, baby rowan trees . . . and that's just the species I can put a name to.

If a neighbour ever brings the subject of the state of my 'garden' up (jokingly, of course), I tell them it's my own personal wee nature reserve.

Joking apart, the local councils spend millions on 'grounds maintenance' which mostly means grass cutting during the summer. I've often thought they could save shedloads of money by allowing grassed areas to grow into meadow areas, which would require much less attention and boost local biodiversity. A couple of years ago, our local council grass cutting tractor was out of commission for several weeks and they didn't have a replacement. It was amazing to see wild flowers taking over the parks, to be followed by an invasion of meadow brown butterflies and field voles. I actually saw voles jumping around in the grass. But people phoned in to complain about the fact that the grass wasn't being cut.

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Stopping things growing is my main concern. I've got an ongoing battle with these pesky weeds (rosebay willow herbs). That's no' my garden btw, but it's a pretty close resemblance.

RosebayWillowherb-Chamerionangustifolium2.jpg

I've also got nettles, brambles, reeds, 6 foot thistles, baby rowan trees . . . and that's just the species I can put a name to.

If a neighbour ever brings the subject of the state of my 'garden' up (jokingly, of course), I tell them it's my own personal wee nature reserve.

Joking apart, the local councils spend millions on 'grounds maintenance' which mostly means grass cutting during the summer. I've often thought they could save shedloads of money by allowing grassed areas to grow into meadow areas, which would require much less attention and boost local biodiversity. A couple of years ago, our local council grass cutting tractor was out of commission for several weeks and they didn't have a replacement. It was amazing to see wild flowers taking over the parks, to be followed by an invasion of meadow brown butterflies and field voles. I actually saw voles jumping around in the grass. But people phoned in to complain about the fact that the grass wasn't being cut.

I think you need a wee mix, Yonza. The weeds can be troublesome but some biodiversity and wild flowers are a whole different story.

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I noticed all my spring bulbs are beginning to come through (even though we still have at least another month of cold weather) The jonquils always come out early. When they bloom I'll take some piccies. I forgot how many bulbs we put in last summer - it's always a nice surprise ;)

All the wattle should be flowering soon too which is a lovely Australian native tree - bright yellow fluffy flowers. It usually flowers in August down here.

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;)

Okay then - 'flooers, froots and poetry annat' then.

From the farmer's market at the weekend... wid ye look at these! Fab.

farmersmarketstrawbs.jpg

Surely 'em wee tottie wans shouldnae hae been picked.

Ye can still pick yer ain at East Yonderton farm ... they were oot in force the day .. I'll bet a few have sair backs the night B)

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Surely 'em wee tottie wans shouldnae hae been picked.

Ye can still pick yer ain at East Yonderton farm ... they were oot in force the day .. I'll bet a few have sair backs the night ;)

When the strawberries turn red they are ready to be picked, tomts, no matter the size.

Great that you can go and pick you own. I don't think I would last much more than half an hour. Hard work.

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Thought some of you might be interested in this call to support the Soil Association's petition to ban neonicontinoid pesticides, which they believe are contributing to the demise of the bee.

"Honey bees in Britain - mainly in rural areas- are dying out. The jury is out on exactly why but the Soil Association is

convinced that the use of neonicontinoid pesticides is a major factor -this seems to be backed up by the fact city bees -

unencumbered by pesticides are, in contrast, thriving.

You may not have a soft spot for bees but we NEED BEES to pollinate our plants & when pollination rates drop, this has a knock-on effect to

the world's food supply and could lead to disastrous shortages and massive hikes in food prices.

So please take just 2 minutes to sign the Soil Association's petition to ban neonicontinoid pesticides and forward this to as many people as you can.

Click here: http://www.soilassociation.org/Takeaction/...34/Default.aspx

"

Interesting to note that there is not the same problem with lack of bees in the city.

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I noticed all my spring bulbs are beginning to come through (even though we still have at least another month of cold weather) The jonquils always come out early. When they bloom I'll take some piccies. I forgot how many bulbs we put in last summer - it's always a nice surprise ;)

All the wattle should be flowering soon too which is a lovely Australian native tree - bright yellow fluffy flowers. It usually flowers in August down here.

Same here Gayle the Fresias & Orchids are budding will be out in a week or 2 IF they dont do a Lynnski & drop off. Dont get daffs though. Was 24 here on Wednesday not bad for mid winter, then the wind changed ,16 today

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Surely 'em wee tottie wans shouldnae hae been picked.

They might look wee in that dish, but they werenae wee. I didnae get the perspective very well.

And every one of them was ripe, sweet and gorgeous.

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Same here Gayle the Fresias & Orchids are budding will be out in a week or 2 IF they dont do a Lynnski & drop off. Dont get daffs though. Was 24 here on Wednesday not bad for mid winter, then the wind changed ,16 today

Yeah I saw that it was 27 in Penrith the other day!!!

We had about -3 here this morning and it's still quite cold - hope the bulbs survived the big frost we had this morning. Forgot to put my car under cover and it took me 5 mins to defrost the windscreen ;) Looking forward to spring now.

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Yeah I saw that it was 27 in Penrith the other day!!!

We had about -3 here this morning and it's still quite cold - hope the bulbs survived the big frost we had this morning. Forgot to put my car under cover and it took me 5 mins to defrost the windscreen ;) Looking forward to spring now.

It can be raining in Edinburgh and bright in Glasgow but such contrasting climates within one country is kind of hard to get your head round, Gayle. Hope it warms up soon.

Mind you, as we never quite know what's going to happen, plants that flourish one year might come to nothing the following year.

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It can be raining in Edinburgh and bright in Glasgow but such contrasting climates within one country is kind of hard to get your head round, Gayle. Hope it warms up soon.

Mind you, as we never quite know what's going to happen, plants that flourish one year might come to nothing the following year.

Its a big country Pat almost 100 times the size of Scotland Varies from Tropical in North to temperate in South

Gayle lives about as far South from me as you are from London. I live on the coast & dont get the temp variation she does living in a more mountainous region, I live on East of Great Dividing Range , Gayle lives on the West & weather patterns differ

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Its a big country Pat almost 100 times the size of Scotland Varies from Tropical in North to temperate in South

Gayle lives about as far South from me as you are from London. I live on the coast & dont get the temp variation she does living in a more mountainous region, I live on East of Great Dividing Range , Gayle lives on the West & weather patterns differ

Pretty dramatic differences, Oz. I didn't realize that it ever plunged below minues in Australia.

It's usually much warmer in London and thereabouts than it is in Glasgow but there are times that they have snow and we escape it but would be unusual to have more than ten degrees or so of variance in the temperature.

We would certainly appreciate a bit more sunshine but I don't enjoy the very hot weather.

We've had a lot of rain this week and our allotment needed a good soaking. We went for a walk in the Botanics this afternoon and then along to the allotment where we spend a good hour or so weeding.

We brought home lettuce, onions, spuds and the last few strawberries and red currants. I wish I had planted a gooseberry bush - I saw some whoppers in one of the plots - I think you plant those round about October so will pick one up later in the year.

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Not much flowering here at this time of year

allamanda.jpg

Allamanda we think from Peony'sneck of the woods

hebe.jpg

Hebe from NZ

gevillea.jpg

Grevillea a native

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So, We've got a 'weans' topic with pics, and an 'animal friends' topic with pics .....is embdy interested in having a more formal Growin Things topic...?

We've not all got gardens, but it seems lots of us urban and not so urban dwellers are definitely interested in nurturin bits & pieces of nature.

Yeah, go on yersel, Westtie, good idea :lol: If people are up for it, we could set up a separate topic outwith Science and Technology?

The Tomassis have been in this hoose (complete with tiny wee postage stamp garden) for 19 years now. I've spent all of em experimenting with loads of plants, flowers, veg and herbs, some of em total failures--- along with some very surprising successes, given the heavy clay soil and not great light aspects.

My favourites in the garden have been grown from cuttings; one a wild geranium from a friend in East Lothian, where the soil and light are very different, a tame honeysuckle from my mother's garden which after 10 years is now half way up the house and meandering throught the hedge, and finally--- a wild honeysuckle twig plucked from the hedgerow and brought home wrapped in damp tissue from Spain, which is finally flourishing after three years and has just flowered today for the first time. Utter joy ;)

I'll get the wean to take a pic when she gets home.... ;)

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Yeah, go on yersel, Westtie, good idea :lol: If people are up for it, we could set up a separate topic outwith Science and Technology?

The Tomassis have been in this hoose (complete with tiny wee postage stamp garden) for 19 years now. I've spent all of em experimenting with loads of plants, flowers, veg and herbs, some of em total failures--- along with some very surprising successes, given the heavy clay soil and not great light aspects.

My favourites in the garden have been grown from cuttings; one a wild geranium from a friend in East Lothian, where the soil and light are very different, a tame honeysuckle from my mother's garden which after 10 years is now half way up the house and meandering throught the hedge, and finally--- a wild honeysuckle twig plucked from the hedgerow and brought home wrapped in damp tissue from Spain, which is finally flourishing after three years and has just flowered today for the first time. Utter joy ;)

I'll get the wean to take a pic when she gets home.... ;)

I love the cuttings too, Rolo, and I am also utterly joyful - I made jam!

Sadly I wasted some of my fruit as I had no sugar in the house so I've only got a couple of jars but it is delish - I just mixed the last of the red currants and the strawberries. Tasty on toast.

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and finally--- a wild honeysuckle twig plucked from the hedgerow and brought home wrapped in damp tissue from Spain, which is finally flourishing after three years and has just flowered today for the first time. Utter joy :lol:

I'll get the wean to take a pic when she gets home.... ;)

;)

Magic. Brave wee sojer - made it in Scotland!

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:lol:

Magic. Brave wee sojer - made it in Scotland!

Lots of different varieties with exotic names like Halliana and Serontina. I've grown Honeysuckle or Lonicera in most gardens that I've had. It's a beauty and not too fussy where about soil or conditions.

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Good idea, Westie! I will have lots of pictures when I get home. One thing I love about Sweden is that they pride themselves on their strawberries. Fresh, ripe, and sweet. I am not sure you can even buy a real fresh strawberry at home. Sure doesn't seem like it.

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Cardwell bloody so-called Garden Centre.

:lol:

Sorry nota, they might be awfy nice folks and an awfy nice wee centre if ye like that sorta thing.... but their plants are not good as far as I'm concerned. Out of 6 bedding plants I bought a month ago, two of them have keeled over and died, stone deid. And I can't remember now how many houseplants I've bought from there that have died.

Especially with regards to the houseplants, it's definitely not my fault. I have loads of them, and I'm good with my houseplants. They've been infested with something or other - only became really noticeable once they got home, and from a garden centre I shouldn't have to spend ages intimately examining them in the shop, now should I? - or they've just crisped up or rotted and keeled over in the pot.

Inconsistent. Not good. I've had much better results with stuff out of B&Q.

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Cardwell bloody so-called Garden Centre.

:lol:

Sorry nota, they might be awfy nice folks and an awfy nice wee centre if ye like that sorta thing.... but their plants are not good as far as I'm concerned. Out of 6 bedding plants I bought a month ago, two of them have keeled over and died, stone deid. And I can't remember now how many houseplants I've bought from there that have died.

Especially with regards to the houseplants, it's definitely not my fault. I have loads of them, and I'm good with my houseplants. They've been infested with something or other - only became really noticeable once they got home, and from a garden centre I shouldn't have to spend ages intimately examining them in the shop, now should I? - or they've just crisped up or rotted and keeled over in the pot.

Inconsistent. Not good. I've had much better results with stuff out of B&Q.

I never used to buy stuff outta B&Q cos it aye looked a wee bit uncared for but this year I got some ivy-leaf geraniums for the hanging baskets and a new type of Salvia, and they've all been great :lol:

My upstairs neighbour did the hanging baskets last year, got them planted up at the ex-servicemen's centre down Greenock way and they were spectacular. My turn this year and oh lordy, I've made a total hash of 'em. Totally underplanted. They're truly pathetic :):lol: :lol: More basket than plant, haha!

And btw, planted up lupins from seed this year for the first time. Anyone know where they are? Not a scooby this end.... :lol:

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