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maryspetses

Lunacy in the UK

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Callum Brown, 28, fought in Afghanistan for the BRITISH army. During this fighting, 6 years ago, his legs were blown off, with other horrific injuries from which he still suffers. He was, and still is being, treated at a specialist hospital in England. He has now, according to the media, been told he can no longer be treated there as he lives in Scotland, unless the SNHS reimburses the costs. So what does British  in the British army mean here? You can be injured whilst in the army but not regarded as British in other circumstances.I am NOT entering into a debate on the legality of this war or the legality of war generally but dealing with the consequences in a sympathetic way, accepting responsibility.I am not fully aware of the machinations of separate fundings within the UK but whatever they are, the officials sitting in their comfortable offices, should pull their fingers out and get the money sorted so Callum can get the treatment he needs.

Edited by maryspetses
correcting omission

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Sounds shocking. Will check out the case. At the end of last year there was a lot of information on social media about teenagers with mental health problems being sent to Scotland for treatment. There are also patients from Scotland who go to England for treatment. I don't know what the reciprocal arrangement is but not doubt there are anomalies. Here's a link to a feature from last year in The Guardian.  https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/dec/11/nhs-england-anorexic-patients-scotland-mental-health


 

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Just received a reply from Jackie Baillie:

As health is devolved it is up to the Scottish Government to secure services for everyone resident in Scotland, and where appropriate, to make cross border arrangements for access to more specialist health services in the rest of the UK and indeed beyond.
 
The example I am most used to is when people living in Scotland access the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle for transplant surgery. In that case the NHS board in Scotland will agree payment to the Freeman Hospital. 
 
This is also the same in reverse, in the event that any resident outwith Scotland does access our health services here.
 
It is therefore the case that Callum should continue to receive treatment in England but that it will be funded by the NHS in Scotland.
 
Like many people, I am grateful for the sacrifice made by our armed forces and believe that we should show that gratitude in practical ways. Treatment for Callum is in my view, something he should be able to access wherever he is in the UK and both governments should always work together to make that the case.
 
Don't see what the problem is...

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Feature in The Independent on 28th says that funding would have to be applied for. Looks like this is the normal course of affairs as is to be expected.  Fortunately Scotland spends a great deal more per head on health than the English NHS.  Although, of course, with the Barnett Formula in place the continuing privatisation of NHS in England means continued reduction for Scotland's share of funding for health care.  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/british-soldier-lost-legs-amputee-afghanistan-nhs-england-treatment-scottish-ayr-bomb-blast-queen-a7864811.html

 

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