Jim's West End Photo Diary - July 2001

My picture gallery contains; photographs of the West End of Glasgow, photographs of Glasgow, and photographs of Scotland.

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28th July

Sheep grazing in medieval graveyard

Three weekends ago, we took ourselves off to Castle Sween for a long leisurely weekend courtesy of Jess Fitzgerald - who kindly let us take possesion of her family caravan.

As is our want, we got out and about a bit. One of the places we visited was the 12th century Chapel at Kilmory Knap, a building amazingly intact for being so old. We entered the Chapel using a huge key that was attached to the doorway by a chain - a remarkably civilised idea I thought. Within the Chapel there were carved gravestones from the 12th, 13 and 14th century - many worked on by known local craftsmen. Below is a picture of Pat reading about the history of the individual stones.

Pat sitting in 12th Century church ruin

Celtic cross

I liked the look of this cross - with its distinct Celtic patterns and mediaeval motifs - it looked as clean and sharp as the day it was made (as if I would I know just how clean and sharp it was 700 years ago).

Jim sitting agains wall

Just for a change here is a photo of me - taken by Pat. As you can see it was nice sunny day. We are relaxing because it had been a fairly long walk to Kilmory.

It was an even longer walk back - particularly when we made the bad decision to take a detour down the hill and along the rocky shore. After an hour or so of stumbling along, and occasionaly falling over, we eventually abandoned the 'shortcut'. While we were contemplating our decision and noticing how tired we now felt, the sun disappeared and the rain came down. Once back in the caravan we quickly recovered.

Mediaval church and graveyard

Above you can see the old Chapel.

Pat at Loch Sween

Pat looking out over Loch Sween - on the road up to Kilmory.

Inveraray view over loch

On the way up to the holiday park at Castle Sween we passed through Inveraray. We stopped and had something to eat and then took a walk along the waterfront and into the town. It was a lovely evening; the combination of the still mirror like water and the soft evening light really made the town and loch an idylic scene; not that I captured it on film. For some reason I felt it must always be like this in Inveraray. Sadly not, when we passed through the town on the way home the weather was dull and the loch was choppy.

Inveraray sail boat

In the photograph above the young people you can see on the right were playing a game of cricket, with the old monument acting as the stumps (or was it rounders or baseball). Instead of a cricket bat or baseball bat they were using a hurley stick (we've been informed that it is a shinty stick - see comment below) to hit the ball. Interesting juxtoposition of cultures, was not the phrase that passed through my mind at the time - but it fits the bill.

Village buildings

We stopped to stretch our legs at the village of Kirkmichael on the way home.

Oban view from hill

Oban view from hill

Views looking down on Oban.

Another excursion we made recently was to the new Science Centre - situated directly across the River Clyde from the West End. It was closed when we visited, we knew it would as there was a well publicised bureaucratic blunder which delayed its opening, but we wanted to have a wander around and see the buildings.

Armadillo and Bells bridge

Side view of Science Centre

Finally to finish off this diary entry, a few more pictures from our West End Festival excursions. The gardens of Belmont Lane were open to the public for the day - and we paid a visit. This entire area has been 'regenerated' by a local project. The upgrading included rebuilding the old Coach House - which you can see below.

The Coachhouse

Mrs Gardner, who lives in Belmont lane, opened her garden to the public for the day. Here is a nice flower from her garden. Her husband, Mr Gardner had been responsible for instigating the fantastic work which is going on in the lane.

Yellow Daisy

3rd July

Big red hats

Best yet! is what I would say about this year's Street Parade and Festival. The organisers excelled themselves by - among other things - getting most of Byres Road closed to traffic and having enough bands, shows, stall, and general party props to put everyone in the party mood.

Byres Road was packed full all day - and all the parade bands did themselves proud - lots of colour lots of music, lots of noise and lots of energetic dancing.

Here are some of the photographs I took on the day. If you recognise yourself in any of them get in touch and I will give you a mention - as well as sending you a photograph if you want it.

Two big heads on poles

Girls at the festival

As usual my memory is terrible - but I think the woman in the middle said here name was Margaret.

Girl in black and white dress

Here's a flamboyant character whom I got to pose for a photograph after the parade was over - again don't know the girl's name.

Girl in blue dress

The parade started from the Botanic Gardens. Here it is just reaching the park gates before spilling out across Great Western Road and heading down Byres Road.

Martin the photographer

Here is a photograph of Martin Gray and Pat. Martin was the official photographer covering the festival.

Red faced devils

Some young red faced devils thoroughly enjoying themselves.

Coming down the slide

Time for a slide.

I have a selection of my photographs for sale in the Gallery Shop.

Comments

Some beautiful pictures in July, but Inverary is actually spelt Inveraray (Gaelic: Mouth of the Aray) and it is very unlikely the kids in one of the pictures are using a "hurling stick". Inverary has a fine shinty team...so what you saw was a shinty caman, from Scotland's oldest indigenous game. And for anyone who thinks this is nitpicking, place a shinty caman (from which we get the term Camanachd, as in the Camanachd Cup) alongside a hurling caman and see the obvious difference. It's like comparing a hockey stick with a golf club. But, as I say, July has beautiful pictures...
--M Reilly ( m dot reilly at angelfire dot com ) from on 20.9.2001; 5:04:26 Uhr

Comments

Yup...just to follow-up on M Reilly's comment...hurling is the gaelic game played in Ireland, Shinty is the game played in Scotland. There are similarities, but in many respects, let alone the caman used, they are 2 seperate games...(the Irish don't have a monopoly on Celtic culture you know!!). A point of interest: every year Scotland and Ireland play a shinty/hurling international match using composite rules to iron-out any advantages/disadvantages...quite an entertaining event by all accounts! See here: http://www.shinty.com/international.htm

daibhidh | Sun Feb 13 2005

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